8

I can engage in some educated speculation about what you think you see, but I'm confident you were fooled by the shadows in the image, which are caused by a low sun angle and distorted by the terrain. These are not inuksuit (which is the correct plural of inuksuk). They are all natural, not man-made. Let's point out a few things we know and can see on the ...


7

First off, the purported variations were reported to be cyclical. So the net effect on archeological dating would be null even if these variations existed. Secondly, these purported variations are very dubious. Scientists are not immune from "crackpot syndrome". If anything, scientists are more susceptible to this than the average public. There's a bit of a ...


6

As I see it there are no clear differences. There are, however, processes that are not compatible with a superposition principle. In geology, it is possible for layers to be folded and result in inverse age relationships. Packs of sediments can also be pushed over other layers during, for example mountain building, so that sequences are out of order or even ...


5

You can get a good idea of the magnitude and wavelengths of typical archaeological magnetic anomalies with a literature search. For instance this page shows a magnetic map of fire hearths http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_survey_(archaeology) Geology is a lot more complicated though and there are many variables that might affect the background magnetic ...


5

Probably the best known is more recent, the 1902 eruption of Mt. Pelée on Martinique, where 30,000 people were killed by pyroclastic flows. I don't know the extent of burial - it appears that the city may have been destroyed more by the ash cloud than the dense part of the flow.


4

Yes. From this article in National Geographic: The last step before digging is to divide the site into a grid to keep track of the location of each find. Then archaeologists choose sample squares from the grid to dig. This allows the archaeological team to form a complete study of the area. They also leave some plots on the grid untouched. ...


3

I've never heard of this exact type of variations, but there are many other variables that are considered by the scientists making radiocarbon dating, such as: C-14/C-12 ratio - this leads to calibration of the dates isotopic fractionation - living organisms have slightly less C-13 and C-14 ratio in comparison to the atmosphere; this ratio my vary during ...


3

Depends upon the species. If the pollen spores are large enough, and of wide spatial distribution, and easily recognizable, and preserves well in sediments, and of distinctive age range (geologically), then it could be used. There have been mistakes in the past where modern pollen collected in microscopic pores in older rock, giving the illusion of rock ...


3

Here is another example: Ceren (El Salvador) around A.D. 660 (discovered in 1978). Ceren is believed to have been home to about 200 people. Researchers have excavated 12 buildings, including living quarters, storehouses, workshops, kitchens, religious buildings and a community sauna. There are dozens of unexcavated structures, and perhaps even another ...


2

In addition to what @GordonStanger said, there are a few other points to consider. Pollens and spores are made out of sporopollenin which preserves way better than what one would expect. Although there isn't probably a perfect 1-to-1 correspondance between pollen morphospecies and the plant species that produced them, there is still a wide variety of pollen ...


1

The field of nuclear physics has established the radioactive decay series for radioactive elements (see here as well). Unlike Uranium 238, Uranium 234 is not primordial nuclide. It is a indirect decay product of Uranium 238. By knowing what elements, and their isotopes, are present in rocks and how much of these isotopes are present, combined with the ...


1

The chemistry of lead is very different from that of uranium and thorium. There are key kinds of rock that could not possibly have been formed with even the smallest amount of primordial lead. The lithophilic nature of uranium and thorium means that those same kinds of rock could easily have readily accepted primordial uranium or thorium. Any lead in those ...


1

Your "Inuksuk" is simply a lucky combination of the sun's angle grazing an erosional remnant of the adjacent riverbank. If you go upriver, you'll see the same erosional remnant, now with sunlight at a perpendicular angle....not so mysterious, right? Far more curious, to me at least, is why the riverbank has been incised in such a way. I suspect ...


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