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148

This is an interesting question, but it lacks a key factor that is crucial to the answer: TIME. The point on Earth closest to the Sun varies through time, so the question can be asked about any moment in time, or over periods of time. Let's analyze the factors involved. At any given moment in time, the point on Earth's surface that is closest to the Sun is ...


10

It is impossible to know. Solar flares can have more than 500,000 kilometers. So if we consider them part of the sun, the moment when the earth is closer to the sun can be very different from perihelion if a big flare happens, making much of what was discussed in other answers irrelevant.


7

First of all, tides are not as simple as the "two-bulge" simplification. In reality, the diagram shown is misleading. The two bulges appear assuming an ocean of constant depth covers the entire surface of Earth. Clearly that is not the case and in the diagram you can see the continents. Considering the different sizes of the basins and the distinct ...


5

Tides arise from the differences in gravitational pull across an object. That's why their strength falls as $r^3$ instead of $r^2$ (where $r$ is the distance between the two objects). Visually it can be understood as follows Does that makes sense? The key is to consider the differences in gravitational pull felt by the Solid Earth and both the water ...


4

The point on the surface of the Earth where the Sun is currently immediately overhead is called the Zenith Point. Its Latitude and Longitude correspond to the Declination and Greenwich Hour Angle of the Sun. These data points can be approximated to any degree of accuracy and timeframe by a Fourier series of n terms. Accuracy sufficient for sextant work ...


4

Answers will be different because they must be tied to a model of solar evolution, and all models are a bit different. So to answer your question we have to select a model. A pretty standard and trusted one, is the one used in the paper Stellar evolution models for Z = 0.0001 to 0.03. Where Z stands for the metalicity of the star, that for the Sun they ...


4

This question can be answered in many different ways that take into account, or ignore, the many factors that affect the total output of a fix solar panel over a year. In general, all answers will agree that the solar panel will have to face the north in the southern hemisphere, and the south in the northern hemisphere. This is because that is the direction ...


3

There are many models that estimate orbital parameters at long timescales. All of them rely in rather complicated formulas that account for the perturbations generated by other planets, the Moon, and many other factors. Some of the models even consider relativistic effects as described in this answer. An orbital solution that I often see cited and used in ...


2

Any area south of the northern polar circle will have one peak per day,and the same goes for the southern polar circle any area north of this will have one peak per day,the polar circles is at 66,33 north/south. The areas whitin the polar circles will have only one peak per year but it will last for half a year. A solar panel will only produce significant ...


2

Whichever spot on the surface of the Earth is experiencing Lahaina Noon, or would be if it wasn't cloudy, is at the subsolar point and pointed directly at the Sun, moreso than any other point on Earth at that moment. Of course, you could get closer to the sun by climbing higher. If you were able to be at the summit of Chimborazo volcano in Ecuador (point ...


2

There are some wonderful answers here, but I think a simplified plain English answer would be helpful. Barring any nearby mountains, and various foibles, the closest point to the sun at the June solstice is where it is midday on the tropic of Cancer. At the December solstice, it is where it is midday on the tropic of Capricorn. At equinox it is where it is ...


1

At any one specific moment the subsolar point is the point on Earth that is closest to the Sun at that specific moment. The subsolar point on a planet is the point at which its sun is perceived to be directly overhead (at the zenith);[1] that is, where the sun's rays strike the planet exactly perpendicular to its surface. It can also mean the point ...


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