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I agree with the comments; some upfront research would be good here, even at a basic level. A good place to start is this Wikipedia article, which gives not only atmospheric heights but also other characteristics such as composition and the behavior of molecules. In terms of heights the Wikipedia article suggests 700 km for the lower boundary of the ...


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Depending on type and size of aerosol there can be scattering, (Mie- and Rayleigh- scattering), atmospheric windows filter radiation, we have absorption, transmission and transformation of wavelengths which all influence the amount of energy that's trapped or reflected back. The lockdown has led to a significant reduction of aerosols and drastic improvement ...


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I didn't really understand where did this "one-sixth of the escape velocity" figure come up from. The "one-sixth of the escape velocity" a ballpark number. As a general rule, three sigma events (events that are three standard deviations from the mean) happen all the time, while twelve sigma events are so very, very rare that they can ...


1

Much of the methyl mercury that enters the atmosphere may be dimethyl mercury, $\text{(CH}_3\text{)}_2\text{Hg}$. This is a very volatile compound which, if it were pure, would have 50 mm mercury or more vapor pressure at 20°C. Complexes involving more electronegative ligands, such as the chloride $\text{CH}_3\text{HgCl}$, are significantly less volatile, ...


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