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Temperature inversions happen everywhere, but they're prone in valleys because the air has no where to go. Cold air is dense. So it drains from high elevation regions to lower ones and hugs as close to the ground as can. This makes valleys especially vulnerable to inversions ... These inversions occur when cold air gets trapped in the valley and a layer of ...


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One other possible source of surface temperature inversions involves bodies of water. On an unusually warm spring day in, let us say, Chicago, the air temperature is inherently warmer than the temperature of the Lake Michigan water below, which is still relatively cool from the preceding winter. So the water absorbs heat from the overlying air, creating a ...


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It is a simple adiabatic scenario. When an air parcel idiabatically raises, its heat exchange with surrounding is zero. Therefore, the decreased internal energy (with the related temperature decrease) of an air parcel is equal to the work done by the parcel during its expansion, and vice versa. This change is reversible.


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The whole idea of well-mixed is that it all has the same properties (as you note the moisture profile, the left line, also follows the mixing ratio, showing it has the same moisture.... winds don't have to be constant, as they are driven by surrounding pressure fields, but will tend to be more similar than in unmixed profiles) Well in terms of temperature, ...


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The thing is, the density decreasing with height, which is caused by the reduced surrounding pressure, does mean the air is spread out more... but likewise also means the water vapor must take up a larger space for the same amount of molecules too. And so that density/pressure change basically doesn't mean any "more room" for water vapor (the ...


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Hate to break bad news, but we don't know. As oxygen is one of most abundant elements on earth by mass (not merely crustal), free protons or hydrogen atoms (as electrons are abundant) are more likely to be a limiting factor for water than oxygen by factor of 100:1. Of course, tracking hydrogen is downright difficult, as it just turns back into water under ...


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Be aware that vapor capacity in $\pu{g/m^3}$ is property of space and water itself - air is just a spectator here. It grows about exponentially with temperature, typically doubles every $\pu{10^{\circ}C}$. The given absolute humidity in $\pu{g/m^3}$ slightly decreases with temperature ( at the same pressure ) due air thermal dilation. The absolute humidity ...


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