We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

1

How things feel is partly psychological and often doesn't have a purely physical explanation. If you run a hot bath and the water from the tap starts to feel tepid, plunge your hand into the very hot water with which the bath is filled. Hold it there for a minute or two, then put it under the tepid tap. The water will feel stone cold, though when tested with ...


1

We are already knowledgeable about some aspects of the requirements needed to terraform Mars & the Moon. As @David_Garcia_Bodego mentions in his comments, gravity is a major factor in celestial bodies being able to retain an atmosphere. This is because the gravity of a celestial body affects the escape velocity of that body. The other important factor ...


1

This is an Earth Science site, not a Mars Science site. However, there will be a manned expedition to Mars within the next 25 years provided a world war doesn't throw a spanner in the works. They won't be exploring methods of thickening the Martian atmosphere, partly because it is impossible to thicken it to any useful degree, by which I mean to a degree ...


2

In the range where a balloon can fly, there is always wind. The NASA Echo 1A satellite was used to test the satellite triangulation. GPS works in some other way... The GPS system used active satellites (non-pasive as Echo 1A) that constantly supplies their position, their time and additional coding information. So the satellite position should be known and ...


0

A balloon satellite like Echo is obviously more affected by the 'wind' (aerodynamic drag) than a normal satellite in low earth orbit would be, but the GPS satellites are so far out that they are unaffected by Earth's atmosphere. Whether this would be true for balloons, with their much greater drag,I am not sure, but in any case they would still have the ...


1

Not directly. What possibly could happen is that rising temperatures turn the parts of the ocean anoxic, which leads to large releases of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic: https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/ocean-chemistry-changes-triggered-earths-greatest-extinction-event/2500368.article


-2

No. For a start, humanity will not burn all the fossil fuels it can find. But let's suppose for the sake of argument that humanity recognises no restrictions and fulfils all its energy needs by burning fossil fuels. Only a limited amount of fossil fuels are recoverable; the vast majority will have to stay in the ground. Oil, for example, won't suddenly run ...


0

The question is very long as is the answer and I don't have time to review all of it in any detail. Most of the atoms in the universe are charged and most of them are moving very fast. A magnetic field will change the motion of a charged particle - that's basic physics. Now, magnetism may be hard to visualize, even with the right hand rule, it's not ...


8

There's not much context, but my guess is that this was a cavum cloud (a.k.a. punch hole or fallstreak), that was caused by an aircraft. The UK Met Office describe how these form: They form in clouds of supercooled water droplets, water below 0 °C but not yet frozen. These water droplets need a tiny particle, a nucleus, to freeze or to be cooled below -...


Top 50 recent answers are included