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The answer to your question depends on where one defines the edge of the atmosphere. The Earth's atmosphere is layered. The thickness, density of composition of each layer varies. The five layers are: Exosphere: 700 to 10,000 km (440 to 6,200 miles) Thermosphere: 80 to 700 km (50 to 440 miles) Mesosphere: 50 to 80 km (31 to 50 miles) Stratosphere: 12 to 50 ...


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This study suggests that the effect on climate change will be neglible: Forster et. al. (2020): Current and future global climate impacts resulting from COVID-19 [...] As a result, we estimate that the direct effect of the pandemic-driven response will be negligible, with a cooling of around 0.01 ± 0.005 °C by 2030 compared to a baseline scenario that ...


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The current popular view is that the total quantity of water on the planet is a constant value. This appears to be an assumption. There has not been enough study and information published on this subject to prove or disprove that burning hydrocarbons fuels can contribute to rising sea levels. Thank you to those who have provided comments and an answer. This ...


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In addition to the atmospheric color effects described by a_donda, there can also be color variations in the sun itself during a single sunrise or sunset, which are again caused by atmospheric effects. Here too, gradients on temperature and density are more important than an overall hot or cold temperature. These gradients cause refraction effects that may ...


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A complex interplay of scattering (Rayleigh-scattering for particles smaller than the wavelength, and Mye-scattering for larger particles), sun angle and attenuation of light on it's path thorugh the atmopshere determine the sky colour. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayleigh_scattering (Linked in a ...


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1.2 x 10^13 kg equals 12,000,000,000,000 l water. One liter equals 0.001 m³, while one km³ equals one billion (1 x 10^9) m³. So we're supposedly adding 12 km³ water to the atmosphere per year. According to wikipedia the total oceanic surface is about 361,900,000 km². If we spread the added amount of water over all the oceans, we end up with a sea level rise ...


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Assuming you are talking about ethanol: it is a common chemical substance, generated naturally from e.g. rotting fruits. So any pollution from hand sanitizers should be negligible. What happens to the alcohol in the atmosphere is an interesting sequence of reactions. I took the info below from an article (see link below). In the air, ethanol is oxidized ...


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As I said in my comment, viruses aren't my area (concerning units). But the answer is actually unitless. The exact answer you seek is dependent on a couple of different variables: The speed of the exhalation (cough or breathing)+speed of wind The atmospheric stability Of course, the viral load of the exhalation is also important, but since you're asking ...


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