New answers tagged

3

TL;DR: Henry's law describes an ideal linear relationship between the equilibrium amount of a low-concentration solute in a solution and the partial pressure of the solute in the gas phase above the solution. Raoult's Law describes the ideal linear relationship between the concentration of the dominant solvent in a solution and the partial pressure of the ...


2

This question is addressed in a Nature paper on "Understanding the glacial methane cycle" (Hopcroft et al. 2017). There conclusion is that changes in methane concentrations are driven by changes in the biosphere associated with the global temperature changes. The dominant factor is the reduction in methane emissions from wetlands in a colder climate. There ...


5

The answer is no, yes and then, perhaps, no. No: water vapour is not "dissolved" in the oceans, rather it becomes part of the oceans through a phase change from vapour to liquid (possibly via an intermediary stage as ice). The process of "dissolving" refers to a substance entering a "solution", which is defined as stable mixture of two or more substances in ...


1

The answer to your question is yes and no. You will not find dissolved H2O in water but water can have dissolved O2 and you can find dissolved hydrogen in water i do not know how common it is in nature but it is possible to dissolve hydrogen in water. And it looks like hydrogenated water is a thing https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_water


1

I'm not a chemist, but I'm prepared to take a punt at the answer: No, there is no water dissolved in the oceans. The water is the oceans.


1

Just a guess, not a specialist on the topic. Pleistocene was characterised by multiple glaciations and interglacial periods. The increase in CO2 concentration and the increase in temperature normally leads to thawing of large ares of permafrost and formation of swamp areas in its place. These swamps release methane in the same way they do today. Obviously, ...


5

Do these "ozone-depleting substances" also have infrared-absorbing greenhouse impact unrelated to their ozone-depleting chemistry, or is the story more complex? Yes, the paper (I have access) actually said that the warming is because of the strong direct radiative forcing of the ozone-depleting agent rather than because of their ability to destroy ozone. ...


0

The linked article seems poorly written. It refers to unexplained climate models and doesn't link the actual paper. In any case the most intuitive assumption is that the missing ozone doesn't reflect the sun UV rays, in this case it would be the opposite of the greenhouse effect, increasing the incoming of radiation instead of stopping the outgoing ...


Top 50 recent answers are included