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Right, there are a lot of misconceptions about this. They are mostly to do with the difference between the magnitude of carbon storage and the rate of carbon uptake, and also the difference between whole site carbon storage and above ground biomass carbon storage. There is also ongoing research taking place which (as you might imagine) takes a very long time ...


2

I've found two sources for molecular hydrogen. The photolysis of formaldehyde (See chemical formula 10 and see Novelli et al. 1999) Anthropogenic sources. While it isn't a source I think I should mention the exosphere. The exosphere is not very dense, so hydrogen (probably) doesn't react with anything. Since it is the lightest element, it probably doesn't ...


2

Besides man-made sources, hydrogen can be produced naturally through a process called serpentization. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, which are rich in magnesium and iron silicates, react with water to produce a variety of breakdown products summarized in the Wikipedia article on serpentine Serpentinization is a geological low-temperature metamorphic process ...


1

Yes, the marine biosphere is a carbon sink, and a very important one. It is known that the oceans produce more oxygen and biologically consume more carbon dioxide than all the tropical rainforests. This is done by microscopic blue-green algae, cyanobacteria and phytoplankton of many kinds. Also by green algae such as seaweeds, by sea grass meadows, and by ...


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