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CO2 is dark in the longwave infra red wavelenght so the higher the consentration is the darker the atmosphere will be in this wavelenght.and as you probably know darker colours absorb more heat. CO2 is not a very powerful greenhouse gas but the amount of it in our atmosphere make this effect the dominating source for the heating we can see today. Lots of ...


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Borrowing an explanation from one of my other answers, the basic mechanism of the greenhouse effect is roughly as follows (note this is also a simplified model) The Earth is in (to all intents and purposes) a vacuum, so it can only gain or lose heat via radiation. The sun emits most of its radiation at visible and UV wavelengths. The Earth's ...


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Because the first few decades are crucial, so we are pragmatically buying time until we manage the transition from fossil fuels to clean energy sources. I heard a podcast announcing Ted's initiative called Countdown, where they presented planting a trillion trees as a solution. A company Flash Forest is being founded on Kickstarter to the amount of 100k to ...


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So, there's really two questions here. 1) if we were to take wood and store it in a way that prevents decomposition, would this help reduce atmospheric CO2? and 2) Would sinking it into the bottom of an ocean trench achieve this? So, first things first, yes removing wood from the contemporary carbon cycle does reduce atmospheric CO2. We already do this (...


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Simple answer: No. The process "carbon sequestration" considers the whole Earth system holistically (otherwise it would not serve its purpose), and in your case, you only look at the plant-atmosphere system so nothing can be said of the amount of carbon sequestered. What you are describing is more close to Net Primary Production, which is defined as carbon ...


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Yes, the marine biosphere is a carbon sink, and a very important one. It is known that the oceans produce more oxygen and biologically consume more carbon dioxide than all the tropical rainforests. This is done by microscopic blue-green algae, cyanobacteria and phytoplankton of many kinds. Also by green algae such as seaweeds, by sea grass meadows, and by ...


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