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CO2 does NOT control Earth's Climate, it plays a role, but so do other factors., in it's long geologic and shorter term histories. It played a role when CO2 was 10x that of present. Even so we had an Ice Age during the Ordivician (4,400 ppm). Jurassic cooling period (1,700 ppm) The biggest influencer is the Sun. magnetic anomolies, sunspots, milankovitch ...


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First Venus has a very thick carbon dioxide atmosphere that traps heat. Wile mars also has a carbon dioxide atmosphere but unlike Venus it is very thin and mars is much further from the sun and there for can't really trap much heat.


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The values on the DEFRA table with the column heading $ kg\ \ce{N2O} $ already include the global warming potential (GWP) factor of 298, as indicated by a note on the column heading (looking at electricity): This is pretty confusing and took me a while to track down, but I figured it out when I noticed that the value in the first column is simply the sum ...


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Unknown, namely because most scientists in "Earth science" related spectrum largely work in the public sector i.e. tax payer funded research (museums, smithsonian, various universities, USGS, etc) hense bias to human anthropological warming tends to be "Yay". You don't receieve funding for a circumstance you don't take as inherently ...


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Yea,but by a mere infinitesimal amount. Earth as a rough sphere has a surface area of 196.9 million square miles or 509 Trillion square meters, add atmospheres thickness 100 miles up it's 200 million of exposed to solar light, 3700 random objects with a area of 5-10 square meters is 37,000 meters square, barely 0.01 square miles, so 1/16 billionth of the ...


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The Antarctic has a feature which the Arctic doesn't - It has the Southern Ocean. This ocean sweeps around Antarctica, to keep the hot air out and the cold air in. Although global warming increases global ocean temperature, Antarctica is less affected due to its 'shield', the Sourthern Ocean. How it works is that the ocean moves rapidly in a circle around ...


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In the absence of a worldwide warming trend, there is a large scale oscillation, the thermal bipolar see-saw. When the Arctic cools, the Antarctic warms and vice versa. With a worldwide warming trend, even if both are warming, the oscillation will still cause one to race ahead of the other, then switch places. See the article Expression of the bipolar see-...


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The IPCC says (PDF page 4, report page 656 of an older report): Increased melting of Arctic glaciers and the Greenland ice sheet, but thickening of the Antarctic ice sheet due to increased precipitation, were projected. Climate change is leading to increased precipitation. (Short version: Warm air picks up more humidity.) In places where it is cold enough, ...


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The Antarctic is not "doing great": Antarctica moved from a weakly negative mass balance in the 1990s to a faster rate of mass loss at a rate of between -45 and -120 gigatonnes per year.


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Let's put it a different way: Specific humidity is how much actual water (vapor) is in the air. More warmth tends to mean more evaporation. Warming air also raises the limit of how much water it can hold in total. So a second reason specific humidity can go up is that it raises the cap level. On the other hand, relative humidity is just a measure of how ...


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Specific humidity is a simple percentage measurement of the total water in the atmosphere, the other term for this is the absolute humidity. Relative humidity on the other hand is the amount of water in the atmosphere as a percentage of the maximum carrying capacity of the air. The carrying capacity of air is temperature dependent, warmer air can hold more ...


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Not quite. The report actually shows an increase in extent, but not the volume, of sea-ice around Antarctica. That sounds good, but the data appendix in the report shows the Antarctic continental ice-sheet is shedding ice so fast during the summer months, and into the Autumn, that the ice can't melt or migrate away during the season. When the winter freeze ...


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Sea surface temperatures warm dramatically as one moves toward the western Gulf of Oman and the Persian Gulf, where the water is protected from mixing and exposed to fierce subtropical summer sun. Despite this fuel for tropical cyclones, none has ever been recorded in the Persian Gulf, mainly because of persistent wind shear and dry air. However, the idea ...


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It is not an invariable and unavoidable correlation between economic growth and growth of CO2 emissions. Civilisation relying heavily on fossil fuels for energy will make CO2 levels rise as it grows but there are now other options for large scale energy production. Civilisation with zero emissions primary energy can grow without CO2 levels rising.


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Clouds form when moist air rises in a convection cell - cloud coverage area is largely controlled by the size of the convection cells, not moisture content. When temperature differences arise between different patches of the Earth, the air over the warmer part expands, creates low pressure, and pulls in moist air at the bottom as it rises. As the altitude ...


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Barring the technical feasibility of what you are proposing, there's a few points to consider which make your proposal problematic. Water vapor is a greenhouse gas. If you increase evaporation, you increase GHGs in the atmosphere. The albedo of water is very low, so if you increase surface area of water on Earth, you decrease the albedo Clouds are ...


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ONE WAY to judge atmospheric CO2 of primitive prehistoric environments is to gauge geologic fossil plants by taxonomic type and geographic source (Taking into account continental drift) Finding tropical variant plant types in areas with now temperate/cold climate.


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