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2

It is not only Milankovic cycles, these are often overrated. Starting in the Cretaceous, thoughout the Paleo- and Neogene the world went from a greenhouse to an ice age that culminated in the Pleistocene. Much is attributed to the arrangement of continents (large landmass to the southpole), change in ocean currents, and slow accumulation of ice shields and ...


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Just saying, a seasonal monsoon is a sea/land system with continent wide consequences as well as a daily change of seawind/landwind around a small island. "Effects of planetary rotation" is too undefined a term imo. Coriolis force will have a strong effect on large scale (10s of km or more) patterns, less on smaller ones. Also local, regional and ...


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I'm not sure of their current status, but I read some papers based on these models a few years ago: Oxford Planetary Unified Model System for Venus (OPUS-V), which is based on an old version of the UK Met Office climate model, HadCM3 (paper from 2016). ROCKE-3D at Nasa GISS, which is based on an old version of the GISS ModelE2‐R climate model (blog article ...


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First of all, I am unsure if your question relates to Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) or field-experiments. I would say divergence is one of the best variables to look at since vertical motion is both difficult to measure and to model. Also, some nowcasting models which includes a nudging method to increase precipitation intensity in the model, based on ...


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WRF is using the sigma (terrain-following) vertical coordinate. However, as @gansub has already referred, in WRF V3.9 you can now select a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate. The advantage of this is that the coordinate is terrain-following near the surface, but it 'converts' to pressure levels at higher levels, which improves the accuracy of the ...


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First things first: There's nothing per se wrong in science with answering "We don't know" to a vexing problem. This might well be one of those cases. The question you are asking was asked by Imbrie and Imbrie in 1980. The problem you have noticed (a very strong interglacial despite low Milankovitch forcing) is now known as the "stage 11 problem", and this ...


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