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First things first: There's nothing per se wrong in science with answering "We don't know" to a vexing problem. This might well be one of those cases. The question you are asking was asked by Imbrie and Imbrie in 1980. The problem you have noticed (a very strong interglacial despite low Milankovitch forcing) is now known as the "stage 11 problem", and this ...


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Prof Malte Jansen and his team at Chicago University have found that when the sea ice surrounding Antarctica increases, it cuts off the supply of CO2 from sea to air, which would explain the lows. When the sea ice retreats, that might explain the highs. You will immediately be thinking that the normal course of events is that CO2 moves from air to sea, so ...


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The RIP-nomenclature is used to distinguish between different runs of the same scenario within a modeling center rather than to indicate any similarity across modeling centers. Strictly it's within and across models not centers, because some centers have more than one model, e.g., the MIROC center submitted models MIROC5, MIROC4h, MIROC-ESM, etc. So r1i1p1 ...


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Weather services rarely state the absolute humidity because it is not easy to determine. Instead, they state the relative humidity. Absolute humidity is the mass of water vapor divided by the mass of dry air in a volume of air at a given temperature. The hotter the air is, the more water it can contain. Absolute humidity is expressed as grams of moisture ...


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First we should be clear on what is meant by "global temperature". Averaged global surface air temperatures have become the most commonly used metric for the state of our global climate and get called "global temperature" but it is not an absolute measure, is not a direct measure of global climate change and it is not the only measurement that could be used. ...


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