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12

I had a very similar question in a job interview! The only difference is that it was an image from SEVIRI on Meteosat. The imager on HIMAWARI is called the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI). The AHI IR1 channel is actually channel 13 with a central wavelength of 10.4 µm, which is in the window region (apparently it's called IR1 in reference to an older ...


11

It is likely because there is already a conversion from the raw data to the grayscale image posted on the CWB website. From this online course (emphasis mine): [...] using the mathematics behind the laws of radiation, computers can convert the amount of infrared radiation received by the satellite to a temperature (formally called a "brightness ...


9

There's not much context, but my guess is that this was a cavum cloud (a.k.a. punch hole or fallstreak), that was caused by an aircraft. The UK Met Office describe how these form: They form in clouds of supercooled water droplets, water below 0 °C but not yet frozen. These water droplets need a tiny particle, a nucleus, to freeze or to be cooled below -40 °...


9

In my recently updated answer to the question: What the humidity metric is hiding? I cite a news article, originally dated 31 January 2020 : Oppressive, humid conditions for southern Australia as heatwave combines with tropical airmass. In the news article, meteorologists are quoted: Dew point is the indicator of the amount of moisture in the air ... it'...


9

Given the weather patterns, it looks like Google Earth is generating those cloud overlays from some recent (i.e., the current day) satellite images. That line is suspiciously close to the edge of disc line for Meteosat 8, which is located over the equator at 41.5 °E. I suspect that it's just an artefact of how they're stitching together the various images ...


7

You are right, you can't get cloudbase height without 3D data. You can do that using radiosondes. However, if your weather station has a ceilometer, then you don't actually need many calculations. However, they are usually quite expensive. If you want a real rough calculation, you can just use the Lifted Condensation Level, which is more valid estimate ...


5

Clouds consist of suspended (floating) liquid water droplets ("liquid clouds"), frozen (solid) ice particles ("ice clouds"), or a mixture of both ("mixed phase clouds"). In-between those droplets or ice particles (meteorologists use the phrase hydrometeor to encompass both) is air which will contain water vapour, but what you are seeing is the liquid and ...


3

The species is Stratocumuls undulatus Sc un. They can form for example when cold, dry air moves over a warmer ground layer. A sharp wind shear at the boundary layer blows these waves. (Wikipedia on Sc). They are not to be confused with Sc radiatus or yet another form, the so-called "cloud streets", which form along the wind direction.


2

I think it could be artificially formed. The parallel background clouds are natural formations; I have seen such formations over Hereford so straight, extensive and parallel that they looked artificial, but weren't. However, the transverse cloud in your photo runs contrary to the natural airflow. One possibility is that an aircraft flew cross grain through ...


2

Maybe you can use infrared satellite images to get the cloud-top temperatures and estimate the height of them over vertical temperature profiles (e.g. radiosondes). But this ís just workingg for the clouds at the top. You can't see what's beneath them unfortunately.


1

There is a parameter ice water mixing ratio in the gfs.t<hour>z.pgrb2.0p25.f<step> file given at isobaric levels.


1

According to the WMO, your answer is as follows. (Note that you can use the width of your little finger held at arms length to estimate one degree and the width of three fingers held together at arms length to estimate five degrees.) Altocumulus is distinguished from Stratocumulus by: Most of the regularly arranged elements having, when observed at an ...


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