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9

No, you can't blame the $CO_2$ concentration per se for your shortness of breath. From the Minnesota (U.S.) Department of Health: The outdoor concentration of carbon dioxide is about 400 parts per million (ppm) or higher in areas with high traffic or industrial activity. [...] Carbon dioxide concentrations indoors can vary from several hundred ppm to over ...


7

Yes, because carbon emissions are like a budget. The Mercator Institute has one of the most commonly cited analyses of our carbon budget: the atmosphere can absorb, calculated from end-2017, no more than 420 gigatonnes (Gt) of CO2 if we are to stay below the 1.5°C threshold. Annual emissions of CO2 – from burning fossil fuels, industrial processes and land-...


5

By far most naturally occurring hydrates are methane hydrates. However, Dillon[1] documents hydration of other gases including carbon dioxide in some places such as the Gulf of Mexico: Many gas hydrates are stable in the deep ocean conditions, but methane hydrate is by far the dominant type, making up >99% of gas hydrate in the ocean floor. The methane ...


3

Phanerozoic CO2 atmospheric levels: Biosphere has been consuming CO2 and storing it in the lithosphere since the Cambrian explosion. The cyclic pattern is related with the tectonic cycles, named the Wilson Cycle, wich has formed two super continents during Phanerozoic period: Rodinia and Pangea. When a super continent breaks, a new ocean is formed and ...


2

There are other greenhouse gasses besides carbon dioxide (in particular water vapor) but in order to give a definite answer, let's pretend the atmosphere is completely free of them. In this case, it's easy to calculate the average temperature of the earth by holding the incoming shortwave heat flux at its present value and assuming that it is balanced by ...


2

The concentration of CO2 in the Earth's atmosphere has remained less than 1% in the past 470 million years when land plants first appeared--long before mammals, and long before humans graced the earth. If we are talking about having a biosphere comparable to the one we know, we need to be talking about CO2 and global average temperatures that are comparable ...


2

The answer is The Carbon Cycle, which includes carbon cycling between atmosphere and oceans, vegetation and soils ensure the Earth does not run out. Volcanoes add very little in proportion to Plant Respiration or Soil Decomposition or Ocean Loss (or even fossil fuel burning) - but unlike those, volcanic CO2 (and similarly, fossil fuel CO2) is not accompanied ...


2

Looking at other planets in the solar system is a good way to get an indication of the role extreme variations of CO2 has. Mercury is closest to the sun, and has a high maximum temperature (449 centigrade) but a very low minimum (-170 centigrade). It has practically no atmosphere, and virtually no CO2. Venus, on the other hand - the planet between the Earth ...


1

As far as displacement of oxygen, CO2 is not even close to a concern. Air is already close to 80% nitrogen, and about 20% oxygen. CO2 is only about 0.04% of the atmosphere, so even if CO2 were multiplied by a factor of 10,000, the concentration of oxygen would decrease by only about 4%. However, the human body relies primarily on the presence of CO2, rather ...


1

Without CO2, Earth would be as cold as Mars or the outer planets between 200-250 degrees Kelvin (-80 degrees below zero fahrenheit) As for more, a 20% gain in current CO2 would be 504 Parts per million in Atmosphere. That's impossible without a century timeframe. But temperature predictions have failed to coalesce. Namely computer models that fail to predict ...


1

Do the calculation for 1 mol of CO$_2$ 1 mol of CO$_2$ weighs 49 grammes = 0.0049 kg 86400 seconds in a day, so 864000 * 0.0049 = 423.36 kg/day/m$^2$ The surface area of the globe is 5.1 x 10$^{14}$ m$^2$ - so 423.6 * 5.1 x 10$^{14}$ = 2.16 x 10$^{17}$ kg/day Convert from kg to Megatons, 10$^9$ kg in a Megaton - so we get 1 mol CO$_2$/m$^2$/second = 2.16 x ...


1

Some locations don't have the available space to dump rubbish underground and those that do are running out of suitable dump locations. Similarly, the location of abandoned mines and the available dumping space is also limited. Prior to using abandoned mines, many will need to be made safe by implementing ground control measures to prevent injuring from ...


1

I think the third paragraph of the article hints at what might be the thinking. In the next five years, the total area covered by artificial rain or snowfall will reach 5.5 million sq km, while over 580,000 sq km (224,000 sq miles) will be covered by hail suppression technologies. The statement added that the program will help with disaster relief, ...


1

A rather late answer on this question, but here goes: The idea that "global temperatures cause the increase of CO2." is fairly easily refuted. The usual line of reasoning is that the solubility of CO2 in water decreases as temperature increases, so the rise in global temperature implies that the oceans will have released some of the dissolved CO2 ...


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