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CO2 does not fall back quickly: graph shows the IPCC 2007 CO2 liftime from a computer model run that shows what happens to a single instantaneous pulse of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere. One thousand years after the CO2 is emitted to the atmosphere 20% is still there according to this model. only zero carbon The decline shown is mostly due to CO2 ...


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Dedito's answer is valid, but I wanted to offer a laymen's version. A nuclear winter scenario blocks the sun's rays from "smoke" (e.g. particulate matter, not transparent gases such as CO and CO2). This causes a net global cooling effect, due to the large volume of particulate that is trapped in the stratosphere and reflecting sunlight back to space. ...


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While the main emissions from these fires are CO2 and CO, the more important difference is what happens to the poorly combusted carbon products that are aggregated into larger particles. The climate community tends to refer to these as black carbon (BC), although that’s an oversimplification. These BC particles are strong absorbers of solar radiation, ...


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The question contains a false assumption that climate science fails to consider the cooling effects of aerosol particles, including from smoke, that are the principle forcing expected for nuclear winter scenarios. Climate science does attempt to quantify every significant effect, both warming and cooling - not only the warming effect from increased ...


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