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11

Short version; the beach moves because the waves change. Long version; Beaches, and in fact entire bays, conform in shape and alignment to the prevailing wave patterns in the area. The exact magnitude and alignment of wave trains varies due to chaotically complex interactions between surface winds, subsurface currents, local seabed features, tide, larger ...


4

Why are waves from full width oceans critical for the formation of cliffs? There are many cliffs in inland regions, particularly, mountainous regions & escarpments along rivers. The sides of Table Mountain in South Africa appear very much like a cliff, as do the sides of mesas. Escarpment cliffs usually occur along geological faults. Some of the largest ...


4

There has been lots of works trying to reconstruct the evolution of the Gulf shoreline through time. They do not agree on the exact same dates (see this review by Sissakian et al. 2020), but they generally agree that there was first a transgression (sea level rise) episode following the last ice age, then a regression (sea level drop). Reasons invoked to ...


3

It should be noted that NetCDF data just describes the format that the data is in. One dataset that I know of (IBTrACS) contains data that is not gridded data, and also contains a landmask. But this is besides your question. To rephrase your question: How can I determine the orientation of the coastline in a gridded dataset? Well, one way is using ...


3

It is called Companion planting, and it is actually fairly common with hand tended fields. It does not work well with mechanized agriculture which is why you don't see it much in large scale farming. It is however, fairly common in gardens and non-industrial farming because they do work well. It has a variety of benefits depending on what exactly you are ...


2

I also live on the coast and have been concerned about what to expect with regard to sea level rise in the near future. The following graph illustrates the observed rise in sea level over the last 30 years: As you can see from the image, satellite data indicates a linear increase in sea level rise of 3.3 mm per year for the last 30 years. If this trend ...


1

Taking water out of the sea does require energy to lift it even if it's destination will eventually be below sea level. The dam idea of retaining rain water would require energy and resources for the production of the dam and require the loss of usable land. That is not the best dam way to approach this solution. Removing water up stream, from say the ...


1

Some desal plants takes brackish water from under ground and treat it. YES it does cause problems with salinity, though the water used is often pumped back underground to be used again. But desalination plants that take water from the sea have no effect on ground water, if anything they can be used to regenerate ground water by agreeing to donate certain ...


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