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16 votes
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How and when people first realized that Antarctica is a continent?

The idea of a southern continent is older than the actual discovery of the Antarctica. There was an expectation of the possible existence of a Terra Australis balance the global landmasses and the ...
user2821's user avatar
  • 5,946
8 votes

How and when people first realized that Antarctica is a continent?

Probably the first recorded observation (and certainly one of the first) of the Antarctic mainland was of the Trinity Peninsula, part of the Antarctic Peninsula, by Edward Bransfield in 1820. Even ...
Pont's user avatar
  • 5,429
8 votes
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How do scientists reconstruct pre Cretaceous continent if all plates that are currently left are younger than Cretaceous?

You forgot about continents First of all, it's necessary to point out the false premise in your question: It is not true that "all plates that are currently left are younger than Cretaceous". There ...
Spencer's user avatar
  • 3,628
8 votes
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Is Australia the largest island?

Australia does get widely referred to as an island as well as as a continent - an island-continent sometimes. My understanding is that "continent" in terms of geology refers to the largest land mass ...
Ken Fabian's user avatar
  • 2,120
7 votes

Origin of the continents

The impact which created the moon occurred quite early into the Solar System's lifespan. Bodies of that size would have both still been mostly molten at the time of impact; so as far as I am aware, ...
desander's user avatar
  • 415
7 votes
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What was the Earth's continent's positions 10000 years ago, or 11700 years ago, AKA when the late Pleistocene epoch was coming to an end?

The reason that you have not seen any diagram showing the position of the continents 10K years before present (ybp) is that the plates move so slowly that there would not be a perceptual difference on ...
verisimilidude's user avatar
7 votes

Given that water will center over the mass of Earth, how could Pangaea be the only continent?

Assuming that the surface density is relatively constant, it would be impossible to have all of the above water land mass concentrated on one side of the Earth. That's a bad assumption. Four key ...
David Hammen's user avatar
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7 votes
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How has the total area of continents changed during the Earth history?

I think the question is asking about the trend, i.e., how did we get from zero continental crust to about 30 % over the Earth's history? Was it linear, another trend? Well, one figure is enough to ...
Jean-Marie Prival's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Do ocean level rise estimates account for mantle elasticity and plate mass changes?

Sea level rise estimates use changes in relative mean sea level. The definition being: Relative sea level is the sea level related to the level of the continental crust. Relative sea level changes ...
arkaia's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is Zealandia really big enough to be called a continent?

In the GSA Today article that Michael linked to in the comments, it says: The Glossary of Geology defines a continent as “one of the Earth’s major land masses, including both dry land and ...
f.thorpe's user avatar
  • 13.6k
5 votes

Is Australia the largest island?

Assuming an island is defined as a body of land surrounded by water, then the largest island in the world is the Europe and Asia land mass (with Africa included if the Suez canal is not regarded as a ...
Ross Fitzgerald's user avatar
5 votes

Is the continent with Australia in it Oceania or Australia?

Partly, it depends on where you got educated. In many countries of Europe, Oceania is the continent. Calling the continent Australia is pretty much considered "English-centric". The reasoning for ...
arkaia's user avatar
  • 15.5k
4 votes

Why Do Supercontinents Form?

Just to reiterate some of the points previously said here: Continental crust fragments that collided are sticky. This results in mountain belts that essentially "glue" the two crusts together. ...
Gimelist's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is the continent with Australia in it Oceania or Australia?

Australia is a continent and Oceania is a region. Continents are vaguely defined as large landmasses separated by water or just by historical context. Earth scientists have much more precise ...
user2821's user avatar
  • 5,946
4 votes

How has the total area of continents changed during the Earth history?

It is widely thought that when the Earth first formed there was no continental crust. Subduction is largely responsible for the creation of continental crust. If true, and there is no reason to think ...
David Hammen's user avatar
  • 23.7k
4 votes
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Formation of Mount Elbrus

It's a fairly dense analysis, but this paper seems to have your answer: Young Silicic Magmatism of the Greater Caucasus, Russia, with implication for its delamination origin based on zircon ...
jeffronicus's user avatar
  • 3,487
3 votes

How do we know the Arctic is just ice?

The Arctic has already been explored extensively by people traversing over the ice, by air and by naval submarines. On August 3, 1958, the American submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571) reached the North ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
3 votes
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How do we know the Arctic is just ice?

The sea floor has been mapped using sonar from ships as shown here, and radar. But the fact was first discovered long before these technologies existed by sailors who got stuck in the ice. The entire ...
timthelion's user avatar
2 votes

Did the formation of Panama trigger the beginning of Ice Ages?

Pretty much, because the joining of the Americas caused a shift in the circulation of the oceans. Because before, there was no antarctic circumpolar current (ACC), but there was a current (maybe more) ...
Mr.inquisitive's user avatar
2 votes

Is the continent with Australia in it Oceania or Australia?

Oceania is a geographical region, Australia is a continent which is a part of Oceania. Oceania consists of four subregions: Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Australasia consists of ...
Jimmy's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Given that water will center over the mass of Earth, how could Pangaea be the only continent?

OK. Let's assume, for the sake of argument, that oceanic and continental crust does have the same density (it doesn't, but that doesn't matter). Let's further assume that everything under the earth's ...
Semidiurnal Simon's user avatar
2 votes

Distortion-free map of all continents

I've been searching for a map that shows all continents in their actual size that is free of projection distortion, to no avail That's because such a thing does not exist. A projection by definition ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.1k
2 votes

How do we know the Arctic is just ice?

You can study the many maps, it seems there is a giant ridge foming but the ice grinds it faster than it rises. Icebergs are grinding the arctic deeper than sea level, like 300/400 meters deep, also ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
  • 1,349
2 votes

Why isn't Panama considered an intercontinental country?

The boundary between North and South America is usually considered to be at (or very close to) the Colombia-Panama border. See e.g., conflictingly, Wikipedia on continent boundaries
Ed Staub's user avatar
  • 231
2 votes
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Why isn't Panama considered an intercontinental country?

Basically the reason is we say it isn't intercontinental. Panama differs from Egypt in two ways relevant to this question. First, even without the Suez Canal a clearly defined narrow neck exists ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
  • 3,926
1 vote

To Determine the Geographic center of a continent, is balance point the accepted method and is equivalent to finding the centroid?

One center that has been overlooked is the center of the smallest circle that can be drawn the entirety of an area. Start by finding the center of the circle that just touches the extreme cardinal ...
ray brown's user avatar
1 vote

Does the position of the Earth's axis affect the position and shape of its continents?

This is an idea that we can consider "wild". Or even better, untamed. Every then and now there are researchers trying to address the questions, but the proof have not been conclusive up to ...
EarlGrey's user avatar
  • 459
1 vote

Is Australia the largest island?

National Geographic has a nice webpage, that explains: There are six major kinds of islands: continental (1), tidal (2), barrier (3), oceanic (4), coral (5), and artificial (6). The article ...
f.thorpe's user avatar
  • 13.6k

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