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The Arctic has already been explored extensively by people traversing over the ice, by air and by naval submarines. On August 3, 1958, the American submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571) reached the North Pole without surfacing. It then proceeded to travel under the entire Polar ice cap. On March 17, 1959, the USS Skate (SSN-578) surfaced on the North Pole and ...


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The sea floor has been mapped using sonar from ships as shown here, and radar. But the fact was first discovered long before these technologies existed by sailors who got stuck in the ice. The entire ice sheet is floating and spinning at a relatively high rate of speed. When they got stuck, they could see, from the stars, that they were moving. I cannot find ...


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You can study the many maps, it seems there is a giant ridge foming but the ice grinds it faster than it rises. Icebergs are grinding the arctic deeper than sea level, like 300/400 meters deep, also considering the glacial maxima when the sea level is lower and there is more ice, whatever mountains are rising in the arctic are weathered far below the sea ...


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Oceania is a geographical region, Australia is a continent which is a part of Oceania. Oceania consists of four subregions: Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Australasia consists of the continent of Australia (aka Australia-New Guinea) and the submerged continent of Zealandia (aka Tasmantis). Two remote Australian external territories, ...


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As answered before, it depends on where are you from. In English-speaking countries Oceania usually includes Australia. In other countries, e.g. Russia or Poland, there is a distinction between "continent" and "part of the world". The continent is Australia, however "part of the world" is "Australia and Oceania". The ...


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