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4

We know the density of the core from seismology. We also know the density of pure iron at given pressure (P) and temperature (T). From these two, people have long noticed that there is a discrepancy: the actual core is lighter than a theoretical core made of pure iron. This is known as the Core Density Deficit (CDD). To explain this CDD, we need to add light ...


0

Simulating the conditions in earth's core is difficult. Maybe one day it can be done. Until then, we must live with indirect methods. The sulphide fractionation towards the core is a valid hypothesis. https://www.geochemicalperspectivesletters.org/article1506 The "lead paradoxa" express another inequality in earth's fractionation, if compared to for ...


5

To address your original concern, no, the fact that there are buildings underground does NOT mean that the surface of the earth is higher than in the past. What is actually happening is that these buildings are subsiding into the ground. How? Believe it or not, earthworms. Worms were once constantly tunneling through the soil underneath ancient buildings, ...


3

The whole mass of the Earth, mantle, crust, atmosphere and sea, contributes to the Earth's gravitational field, not just the core. Unless you want to split hairs, the Earth's gravity is the same now as it always was. In case you do want to split hairs, the Earth collects a substantial amount of space dust, meteorites and cosmic debris every year, but no one ...


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Earth's radius is about 6400 kilometres. That's 6400000 metres. Let's say that you have a mound 20 metres high, burying an older settlement. Your new "radius" is now 6400020 metres. Let's say that $g = 9.8\ \rm m/s^2$ at 6400, your new gravity will be $g = 9.799939\ \rm m/s^2$. Clearly, this is hardly "lower level of gravity". To make this even less ...


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