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19

Don't think of the Coriolis force as deflecting motion clockwise/counter clockwise, but to the right (NH) or left (SH), when looking in the direction of the motion. So this is sort of 'by definition'. A cyclone is a low pressure system, and air will move from a location with high pressure towards a location with low pressure. The Coriolis force will deflect ...


12

To correct your phrasing slightly: The Coriolis force acts to turn flows in the northern hemisphere to the right. This is not quite the same as "in a clockwise pattern", as will become evident in a moment. Cyclones have a low pressure core and higher pressure outside. Therefore, the wind is flowing from the outside in. When we think of a cyclone, we think ...


9

Tornadoes, land/waterspouts and supercell thunderstorm mesocyclones are examples of vortices where Coriolis is unimportant. Tornadoes are in cyclostrophic balance. Land and waterspouts (as well as non-supercell tornadoes) arise from horizontal convergence of vertical vorticity. The supercell mesocyclone spin originates as horizontal vorticity that is ...


6

Key differences are in structure, location, environments they thrive in. To compare/contrast these storms I'll use a mid-latitude cyclone for the cold core cyclone and a hurricane for the warm core cyclone. Structure The hurricane is nearly symmetric and devoid of fronts. The mid-latitude cyclone is asymmetric (comma shaped with a long tail) and has ...


4

There's a few problems with this question. The first is, the Coriolis effect isn't a force in and of itself. It's a velocity dependent effect. If the wind speed is zero over the North or South Pole, the Coriolis effect would be zero. If the wind speed is 100 kph over the pole, the Coriolis force would be (if this site is trustworthy) $0.000146 \times ...


2

No, it isn't possible for cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, which are all different names for the same thing, to form over land. Storms can form over land, but not hurricanes, which draw their power from the sun-warmed ocean and rapidly lose their strength when they hit land. The power of a typical hurricane is immense, probably in excess of 50 megatons, ...


1

Extratropical cyclones are relatively well understood. They often follow the Norwegian Cyclone model, which was developed in the 1910's and 1920's. Because of their spatial extent, extratropical cyclones are often less intense than their tropical counterparts. Since they are so much larger and live longer over land, it is easy to get data about an ...


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