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3

No, not really. In simple terms, to be soluble in water, Pb must be in contact with it. But most of Pb is stored within the Zircon lattice, where water cannot diffuse through. For example, many zircons in metamorphic and magmatic-hydrothermal settings experience supercritical fluids, but preserve their U/Pb ratios (e.g. inherited cores in metasedimentary ...


9

The four stable isotopes of lead and their relative abundance on Earth are: 204Pb (1.4%), 206Pb (24.1%), 207Pb (22.1%) and 208Pb (52.4%). Lead-204 is a primordial nuclide and is not a radiogenic nuclide. 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb form as part of the radioactive decay chains of Uranium and Thorium and they also occur as primordial nuclides that were made in ...


13

While lead 206 does occur naturally, unless a zircon (a zirconium silicate crystal) is contaminated with lead or has been around a long time, it will contain no lead. Zirconium, uranium, and thorium have similar chemistries. Lead has a dramatically distinct chemistry. The chemical reactions that form zircons can accommodate uranium or thorium replacing ...


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