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ScienceMag says: Rather than damaging the fossils by dating them directly, the team looked to the sediments in which they were found. They discovered pieces of charcoal in sediments at similar depths, and considered those to be proxies for the ages of the fossils themselves. The charcoal bits were dated to around 19,000 and 13,000 to 11,000 years before ...


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If the fossils, or some of them, were as you describe them with no mineral replacement of the original material, then it would seem that C14 dating would be relevant for the youngest bones at least. If they had original material with adequate carbon in it,C14 is such an obvious method that they must have tried it, or had some very good reason not to. C14 is, ...


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Firstly, there are simplified analytical cases that even undergrad students are able to master that inform us how decay rates generally depend on other natural constants and available energy levels. Those cases, while not describing full reality, give us important information, namely that if a decay constant would not be constant, then either other ...


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First of all, you shouldn't take creationists seriously; like flat earthists, their views are totally out of touch with reality. Rates of radioactive decay have been tested many times in the laboratory and found to be accurate. However, there have been some instances where a substantial change of temperature or the formation of a chemical compound involving ...


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Potassium 40 has a half life of 1,300,000,000 years, which means that within that time half of the 11 percent which you refer to will have decayed to form Argon 40. Potassium 40 has two modes of decay, which is unusual for a radioactive isotope. Only 11 percent of it becomes argon 40, the remaining 89 percent decays by a different mode and becomes Calcium ...


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