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9

I've built DIY conductivity probes for subglacial measurements. Unfortunately my sensors remain under ~100m of ice so I haven't be able to recover them to check the calibration, but for the same reason, I've taken multiple measurements to reduce calibration drift, as I'm unable to re-calibrate them. So far, they have produced sensible data for 2+ years, but ...


7

The magnitude of an earthquake is related to the total energy released, therefore to estimate it from a seismogram you need to know the distance to the source. In the case of the Richter scale for example, the relationship between magnitude and seismogram amplitude is defined for a standard distance. If you have only one seismograph, you can not triangulate ...


4

Chances are you do not have presences of fuel in your water. This sounds like you could have a few different things happening. First off, iron reducing bacteria can lead to significant corrosion. These are bacteria that feed on iron both in the water and also in plumbing systems. They also can put off a smell. The second one is manganese. If you notice this ...


3

The transmissometer setup should be quite easy to build in principle, but it could be hard to get accurate values. I did a very similar instrument but to measure water transsmisivity (a.k.a. turbidity). If you are new to Arduino you can start with the Arduino UNO board, and this is a good guide on how to get started. I got started myself with the video ...


3

This question might be better suited for Chemistry or another place, and I'm not certain Earth Science is the place for it. Without being an expert on groundwater, water supplies, or hydrocarbons I would say this. First of all, "deteriorating water pipes" should not lead to any smell. Certain trace metals may be leached from metal (mostly copper) tubing, ...


2

While the best way to test for hydrocarbons in drinking water is to get a specialized test kit like the one you posted in your edit or to send a water sample to a lab, there might be a cheaper DIY way to do it. I haven't tested it but I think it is worth a try: Detecting hydrocarbons is exactly what is typically done when detecting leaks due to broken head ...


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