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Meteorology relies heavily on a spherical model of the earth. If you consider one of the major "forces," the Coriolis force, it is derivable only from a spherical earth. Now, there are planar representations, where the earth's curvature has a negligible effect, such as mesoscale meteorology or micrometeorology. A sphere also has modeling advantages ...


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A complicating factor will be the change in density with temperature. So for this I will assume a constant density of water. As the thickness of the water layer is quite small compared to the size of Earth (given as 2.6 km by the answer to the other question) I think an approximation with a constant g at any particular location should give a fairly ...


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The only answer I can come up with is related to isostasy. 1 - Poles melt, so there's more water in the oceans. 2 - As there's more water in the oceans, there's more weight on the oceanic crusts, so they bend, making deeper some parts of the oceans. 3 - The parts of the ocean that are deeper are in the centre of the oceans, far from continental crust. It ...


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This study seems to suggest that global warming will change oceanic circulation and transfer a net increase of mass to the poles, closer to the axis of rotation, therefore speeding up the spin. article: https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn11555-global-warming-will-make-earth-spin-faster/ study: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1029/...


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Like Fred said, this probably belongs on Astronomy SE, but I'll give my best answer anyways. No, the sun and moon do not take the same path each day. The key to understanding this is knowing that the earth is tilted 23.5$^\circ$. Let's take an example- the arctic circle. On the summer solstice, the sun doesn't set- It goes around and around (called the ...


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