14 votes

Could a massive flood have formed the Grand Canyon?

tl;dr: no. Long answer: First of all, like mentioned by others in the comments, you would need some physical mechanism to take a whole lot of water, evaporate it, and drop it at once at a place ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.1k
13 votes

How long does it take for a stone to alter?

Mountains and rock do decompose or weather into sediment. A basic rock cycle overview shows the possible pathways between all three rock types (igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary) how one type ...
Earth Science Expatriate's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Will the oceans swallow all of the land?

If no new mountains were built, yes. Ultimately the processes of erosion would render the continents flat, and the seas would be left shallow and filled with sediments. The reason that this doesn't ...
Arkenstein XII's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Erosion without weathering?

Your concept of weathering is erroneous. It is not uncovering or stripping off material. Weathering is a very slow process of breaking down rocks, soil & minerals, in-situ, via contact with the ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Could a massive flood have formed the Grand Canyon?

In addition to all of the above there are meanders inn the Grand Canyon which are hydraulic outcomes of 'minimum energy flow configurations'. This constrains the discharge rates that are possible - to ...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Confused about whether physical impact is 'erosion'

I'm assuming here that you're asking whether you can apply the term ‘erosion’ to the damage your stone suffered, rather than the damage your floor suffered. In this case, the applicability of the term ...
Pont's user avatar
  • 5,429
6 votes
Accepted

Is an underground mine collapse or a tunnel collapse called a sinkhole?

This is probably more of an English language question than a science question. The answer to it depends on the extent of a person's vocabulary & knowledge of a particular field of engineering. ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
6 votes
Accepted

Could the Grand Canyon be flooded by the ocean if it got deep enough?

It is unlikely just from erosion. There are a couple reasons for this but because of the time scale over which this process would occur, other phenomenons might change the geologic picture completely. ...
Gabriel's user avatar
  • 246
6 votes
Accepted

How do canyons form?

I guess you are talking about subaerial (as opposed to submarine) canyons, and are mostly thinking of numerical (as opposed to physical) models. I expect there are numerical models suitable for ...
Matt Hall's user avatar
  • 11k
5 votes

Will the oceans swallow all of the land?

Interesting question. As long as plate tectonics persists, then, as @Arkenstein mentions, mountain building and ocean basin formation will create enough topographical variety to ensure that land ...
Andrew Jon Dodds's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How does the west coast of Japan have cliffs?

Why are waves from full width oceans critical for the formation of cliffs? There are many cliffs in inland regions, particularly, mountainous regions & escarpments along rivers. The sides of Table ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
4 votes
Accepted

How large is the chance that the Badlands Guardian emerged from natural processes?

The chance that this occurs in this particular spot is indeed small. The chance that a natural face-like feature occurs somewhere on the earth's hundreds of millions of square miles of land area is ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What produces these amazing 3D structures in Tibet?

The terrain examples show some striking similarities to what is referred to in the United States as "Badlands" - a type of terrain formed by layered sedimentary strata of rock that is soft enough to ...
dplmmr's user avatar
  • 1,144
3 votes

What is the erosion rate of mountains?

This may not answer your question, but it indicates that erosion is extreme at high altitudes. More than 60 percent of the sediment delivered to the world's oceans in the prehuman world originated ...
Keith McClary's user avatar
3 votes

What is the purpose of analyzing the bed-load of a river?

Typically rivers can be divided into three areas when it comes to erosion: far upstream there is the area where most erosion happens in the middle mostly transport of material happens downstream ...
Erik's user avatar
  • 756
3 votes

How does this melted-wax erosion pattern form in sandstone?

Differential erosion, the "wax-drips" have been hardened by chemical deposition, usually by calcium salts, washed down from the soil at the top of the cliff. There are different mineral deposits that ...
Ash's user avatar
  • 4,260
3 votes

Are there any photographs of mountains without significant erosion (on Earth or otherwise)

Alternatively, are there any mountains on Earth where (for whatever reason) erosion hasn't played a big role in shaping them so far, and which therefore look similar to the uneroded mountains one ...
Knob Scratcher's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

How long will it take for the ocean to erode Rockall?

Impossible to give an accurate answer because nobody has ever studied rates of erosion of this kind of rock in such a setting. Typical long-term rates of cliff cut-back in an exposed position are 5 to ...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
3 votes

Original Diameter of Ancient Impact Craters

When comparing the sizes of the two craters, you are confusing how erosion works. Erosion did not shrink the original crater to from 43 miles to 430 meters. The crater was 43 miles across and was ...
Wolfgang Bangerth's user avatar
3 votes

Can "meanders in meanders" form naturally?

In the case that you show there are so-called incised meanders cut into the bedrock in which material has been deposited when lake levels have been high. When lake levels have dropped the sediments ...
Peter Jansson's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can "meanders in meanders" form naturally?

Yes. Here's an example of a river in Siberia (at about 62°08'N 83°06'E) that appears to be unimpinged by human activity. It's a bit hard to see both scales at once, but the river meanders all over the ...
Matt Hall's user avatar
  • 11k
2 votes

The Dust Bowl: how's the recovery of all that topsoil going?

There's No way to ascertain the level of soil reclamation since the 1930's the Soil Conservation service keeps track which I assume you can learn online if they have their data. Agronomic libraries ...
LazyReader's user avatar
2 votes

Have there ever been any islands that disappeared due to rising sea level?

Three very recent examples are Esanbe Hanakita Kojima in Japan (disappeared between 2014 and 2018) Hawaii's East Island (wiped away by a Hurricane in 2018) Sandy Island ("undiscovered" in 2012) I ...
Everyday Astronaut's user avatar
2 votes

How long does it take for a stone to alter?

Millions of years. While it also depends on what kind of rock you're asking about, @GaryKindel's answer above lists a number of other properties a rock has that will effect the time it will take to ...
Eevee's user avatar
  • 485

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