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81

The water in any river draining the sea is infinitely recycle-able (from rain replenishment), whereas the salt from any terrestrial source is not. So salty rivers, if any, won't exist permanently. Saltwater lakes gain their salinity precisely because they have no outlet, so salt just gets concentrated by evaporation. I don't think there are any truly saline ...


31

The already accepted answer is already covering the "real" answer as far as I'm concerned, and while you won't find many (any?) saline rivers in the traditional sense, we do have underwater "rivers" that kiiiiind of but not quite fit the bill. They're not saline rivers as I expect you envision, but I figure they could be an interesting "by the way though" ...


27

In the case of Río de la Plata, part of it is history and politics, and part of it is oceanography. Most of Argentina and Uruguay considers Río de la Plata as a river (thus, the name, río) and as such it is the widest river in the world (maximum width >200km). Río de la Plata is formed as the confluence of the Paraná and Uruguay rivers and results in a ...


25

The Pecos River in Texas, USA may arguably fit the description of a "saltwater river". A point of argument is what is considered to be "saltwater". For comparison, here are some bodies of water and their salinity. 35,000 ppm Pacific and Atlantic Ocean 13,000-23,000 ppm Black Sea 12,500 ppm Caspian Sea 10,000 ppm Baltic Sea Note though, that salinity ...


22

Water from the Caspian sea, with a salinity of 1.2%, is constantly flowing into Garabogazköl, where the water eventually evaporates and leaves the salt behind. Of course, the situation is not indefinitely stable, as the depression is eventually going to be filled with salt. But at the time writing, water is still flowing like a river through the very narrow ...


17

Here in New York City we have a salt "river". It is called the "East River" and it separates part of Long Island (Brooklyn and Queens) from the island of Manhattan and the mainland (The Bronx). Indeed it looks a lot like a salt river: From a hydrology perspective it is not a river tho, it is actually a saltwater estuary.


12

I live near a river named Salz, flowing both warm and salty on the north slope of the Pyrenees south of Carcassonne. In historical times it was boiled dry for salt. See Les Sources de Salz


11

There are salt water rivers in different places of the world where ground water flows in contact with salt layers. There is a river in Catalonia named Ribera Salada (meaning salty river in Catalan). My translation from Catalan Wikipedia: It gets its name because one of its originating currents - Fred river - comes from sources in Triassic lands with a ...


9

Here in Western Australia we have many salt water streams running through farmland affected by dry land salinity. It's a huge problem where land cleared for agriculture has experienced rising water tables effectively bringing salt to the surface. This salt is washed into the creeks by rain and these streams are essentially salt saturated - far saltier than ...


9

There is an area with several salt rivers and wide salt streams that exists in Russia - it's in Yakutia (Sakha Republic), part of Siberia. Water of Solyanka River (flowing in to the great Lena River) contains 21 g of salt per liter, some neighboring streams can contain up to 70 g of salt per liter of their water... According to science, millions ...


8

The Werra – a natural river – had and up to a certain degree still has at least a brackish water body. A portion of the salt content of the river comes from natural leaching, the greater part is passed by nearby potash industry. (Heringen with the Werra between mine and city. The picture was shot from the Monte Kali) The legal threshold value in the 1940s ...


7

Typically, the river delta is considered the end of a river where it flows into either an ocean or lake. From the image shown below, the end of the river can be defined by either at the edge of the active delta plain. or the edge of the submerged delta plain Active boundary will vary due to tidal level, river level and the rate of subsidence of the of the ...


7

Beyond the answers above, here is a small river near Berca, Romania, where active mud volcanism and salt diapirism are widespread, explaining the high salinity of this water. Salty river. Note box for scale. (My own picture, geotagged)


6

There is also a hypersaline periodic water flow, which although a few times more saline than sea water, I might be hesitant to call a river. However, due to its high salinity (well above everything else mentioned here), I thought it was worth mentioning. It is called Blood Falls. It is the periodic draining of a brine reservoir under the Tylor glacier in ...


6

Here in Norway we are mighty proud of "Saltstraumen"(meaning Salt Stream) Again, not technically a river, but a narrow strait connecting the ocean to a wider fjord behind it. As the tides go in and out, Saltstraumen does too. It is the world's strongest tidal current. Wikipedia link.


5

There are specific rivers that sometimes flow inward called Tidal Bores. A great example of a Tidal Bore is the Amazon River.


5

Świna (note that while english wikipedia lists it as a river, both german and polish wikipedias are more ambiguous, for example polis wiki descirbes it as a "strait" of the Baltic sea): Świna (Wikipedia).


5

The effects of Coriolis in rivers and estuaries are more subtle than in the open ocean. Coriolis tends to be a second or third order process in fast-moving and relatively small systems like rivers. On the other hand, when the residual flow in an estuary is considered, then that process tends to be slow and persistent and the effects of Earth's rotation (...


3

From my country there is indeed a saltwater river in the north western state of Rajasthan - Luni river. It is not salty from the point of it's origin but does become salty as it flows downstream. Here is a more complete description of the Luni river - Luni River basin facts. Looking at this book - Contributions to the ecology of halophytes one wonders ...


1

NOTE: Okay, I'm trying again to answer this question. I'll make sure to back it up with accurate information this time :) There is a river in Arizona called the Salt River. In the article linked, it states the river is 'special' because It's salty. There are known to be more than just the Salt River; but there's an example of a saltwater river for you :) ...


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