19

The record the article is referring about seems to be the same as registered at Guiness World Records: On 13 September 2012 the World Meteorological Organisation disqualified the record for the highest recorded temperature, exactly 90 years after it had been established at El Azizia, Libya, with a measurement of 58°C. The official highest recorded ...


8

On the North American west coast, Coos Bay, Oregon is the northernmost place I can find, of any significance, that gets no snow. Astoria, Oregon gets 2.5 cm of snow per year. Coos Bay is at 43.4 degrees north latitude. On the east coast, Boston is of similar latitude and gets significant snow, so that coast is out. In western Europe, A Coruna seems to be ...


6

Yes, a layer of snow on top of ice can melt in some circumstances. For example, one active area of climate research involves analyzing the optical properties of sea ice as they relate to incoming solar radiation. In some studies (e.g., Ehn et al. 2004) this involves snow layered on top of ice, with the snow explicitly melting (and later refreezing) over the ...


5

The Hadean era covers the time from the formation of the Earth until 4bn years ago. It was characterized by a surface of molten rock, due to repeated meteor strikes, volcanism and radioactive decay. "Liquid water oceans existed despite the surface temperature of 230 °C (446 °F) because of the atmospheric pressure of the heavy carbon dioxide atmosphere....


5

First thing first: It is very hard, if not impossible, to attribute a single anomalous weather event to climate change. The weather exhibits a huge amount of natural variation. The recent spate of cold weather that recently has hit the eastern part of North America is consistent with climate change and has even predicted to be a consequence of climate ...


5

We define rain events in terms of the probability of reccurrence. For example, we call a certain rainfall the "10-year rain event," meaning that this amount of rain would only be expected to occur once every 10 years. We usually like to have at least 30 years of data before calculating recurrence intervals. Note: Just because we call something the 100-year ...


4

The wikipedia article List of weather records explicitly states This list does not include remotely sensed observations such as satellite measurements, since those values are not considered official records.[1] Reference 1 in that article, a web archive link to a page on World Meteorological Organization Global Weather & Climate Extremes, adds that (...


3

One existing classification for return period events is minor and major flows, which basically classifies floods into those that the storm network (pipes and small conveyance network) is designed to handle, typically in the 2-10 year event range, and those more major floods which will overwhelm the stormwater infrastructure and are mainly conveyed by ...


3

The easiest thing to do to make your copper pole safe would be to ground it and disconnect the lights from your house wiring when they aren't in use (if they are plug-in lights and not solar). This article on how lightning rods work is a pretty good explanation of why you do want to ground a tall, conductive pole. Electricity will travel the path of least ...


3

Any build up of static electricity in the ground will seek to connect with opposite charge in a storm cloud, and will spark through the line of least resistance. Any high metal structure, whether it is copper or not, is a candidate for the line of least electrical resistance. You may be able to protect your copper support by a higher lightning conductor (...


3

First things first. Global "Weirding" is very difficult to quantify. That doesn't mean it's not happening, but it's inexact. The idea came from climate models, which produced a lot of unexpected variations as opposed to more smooth and consistent warming and weather patterns are so complicated that there's still a lot of unknowns in this area. Warmer ...


3

Pressure and temperature are not all the same when going up vertically. See average temperature and pressure profiles. The evaporation of any liquid has a pressure-dependent equilibrium point, see the phase diagram of water and Clausius-Clapeyron for a mathematical description of the equilibrium point. However, I assume that you mean with 212°F (100°C) ...


2

It will depend on how the temperature and humidity change as the raindrops approach the bottom of the column. If the air is hot and dry, the drops will evaporate. If it's hot and humid enough, they may survive to hit the bottom. Remember that the boiling point of water rises as pressure increases! Your statement "If it rains at a temperature lower than [32 ...


2

It seems like there is more than just a hurricane going on. According to the National Weather Service there are excessive heat advisories, gale warnings, etc.


2

Since you comment on statistics provided during sport events, I should point out that this method is not scientifically sound. The reason is that for any given data you will find something that will make this dataset unique or "the first of this kind in recorded history". For a light take on this, refer to this XKCD comic. What is methodically required is ...


2

Here's an amazing one: In June 1991 category 3 Typhoon Yunya made landfall in central Luzon in the Philippines and gradually weakened as it moved across the island... however as it was near exiting the island... Mount Pinatubo sustained the largest volcanic eruption in our lifetimes -- almost directly in the center of the storm! Here is a remarkable ...


2

Fury Road storm seems like quite a realistic representation of a huge thunderstorm advancing over a desert. The gust front would lift the sand in the bottom ahead of the storm center. Winds inside the storm would diverge at a higher altitude causing the sand to fall ahead of the actual storm. In reality thunderstorms do produce dust storms with their gust ...


1

You're heading along the right lines, but there are a few things you might want to make sure you've thought about when deciding on your method. 1. Notation A long time ago there was an Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring and Indices (ETCCDMI) that came up with some naming conventions for various climate indices, because it gets a bit ...


1

It is common sense. The more energy in the Atmosphere the most intense will be the stirring up of it, so you will get cold polar air and hot tropical air moving around further and producing extreme weather.


1

Forest fires, and natural disasters in general, get attention when they affect people. Bush fires outside of metropolitan Perth or far away from populated areas do not affect many people. Therefore, media attention is diverted elsewhere. This is not unique to WA: you have the same in NT, northern SA, and the west of eastern states. This is also not unique ...


1

Yes. Here's a list of common disasters that associate with each other: A twister (tornado) that fused with a wildfire (aka: a firenado) A cyclone (Hurricane) that caused a tsunami (common) An earthquake in the ocean that caused a tsunami (common) ...and probably several more. But many times such an occurrence is typical, and often happen; such as oceanic ...


1

a warming planet makes storms worse in two ways. The most straightforward comes when you realize storms are driven by differences in temprature and pressure between different parts of the atmosphere, climate change does not worm all parts of the atmosphere equally leading to greater variability in temprature, by warming the ocean this difference becomes even ...


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