29

Just to add some further discussion to @Pont and @fre0n excellent answers. The problem of the water needed to submerge the world during the Genesis flood have been discussed for centuries. The narrative could seem legit as traces of marine condition can be seen even in high mountains. The Biblical flood was the most logic explanation for marine fossils ...


24

Regarding climate, it does not rain in Seattle as much as people think; Seattle is in the snow shadow of the Olympic Mountains. It doesn't rain much in summer at all. Seattle gets rather dry in July and August. Regarding flooding, the Skagit and Snohomish rivers north of Seattle flood regularly experience flooding. Some of the land in the flood plain is used ...


23

there is not enough existing water inside this geosystem IMO for such a thing to occur. Let's see these figures here: One estimate of global water distribution Oceans, Seas, & Bays 1,338,000,000 -- 96.54% of all water this figure means that most of the existing water at the global scale is seawater. Sea floor is quite irregular, with some abyss like ...


20

The "precipitation rate" part is easy to answer, at least to a first approximation. We have 40 days and nights (960 hours) in which to raise sea level above the peak of Mount Everest (let's round up and call it 9000m). Thus, we need a precipitation rate of around 9000/960 =~ 9.4 metres per hour. For comparison, the largest rainfall ever recorded over an hour ...


17

Catastrophic flash flooding is usually a sign of poor city/road planning in flat areas or due to torrential downfall of rain. The reality is that all the terrain in Washington allows water to drain, rather than be left standing (which causes flash flooding). And let's be clear, it doesn't rain hard in WA, it's usually not torrential downpour, bur rather a ...


14

tl;dr: no. Long answer: First of all, like mentioned by others in the comments, you would need some physical mechanism to take a whole lot of water, evaporate it, and drop it at once at a place where the Grand Canyon is now. This is not something that's going to happen because of physics. If there was some extraordinary event which could have caused this, ...


11

Fishing through the links mentioned over at Christianity SE, I netted this scientific paper about freshwater and marine fish: Why are there so few fish in the sea?. Apparently the bulk (96%) of marine species have a single freshwater ancestor species extant 300 Mya (300 million years ago). Descendants of this species did not enter the ocean until about 180 ...


10

The structure looks similar to this photograph of a "Japanese land retention system" mentioned in passing towards the bottom of this webpage. From the linked page: Land retention systems in Japan, for example, are often designed as heavy waffle grids which are molded to the topography and cover it to a uniform structural depth. This seems to correspond ...


8

In addition to all of the above there are meanders inn the Grand Canyon which are hydraulic outcomes of 'minimum energy flow configurations'. This constrains the discharge rates that are possible - to within the normal range of hydrologic discharges. Furthermore there are several places in the Grand Canyon where there is clear evidence of the river having ...


7

A flood occurs when land that is normally dry is covered by water. The source of the flood water is generally from bodies of water, such as: rivers, lakes, dams and even the ocean. Rivers can flood, when: the flow rate exceeds the capacity of the river channel Similarly, excess water run-off during heavy rain can cause floods when the water cannot drain ...


7

My first thought would be to use Manning equation as an approximation. It does not take into account the effect of a dam burst providing excess water and immediate flooding, although for larger scales (in terms of river reach) this is likely less important. Detailed hydrologic models may not be the right answer by the way, especially for the tradeoff of ...


7

No it isn't possible. 7000 feet is 2133 metres. That water level would cover almost all the land mass of the globe, except for the highest mountains, like the Himalayas, the Andes etc. It would need at least twice the current volume of water in the ocean. Total melting of all icecaps would add less than 2% of the volume of water required. There might be ...


6

The causes vary around the world, but we can make some generalizations. Seasonal floods mean that there's more water coming in than going out for only part of the year. If it's annual, the changes are probably related to annual weather patterns in precipitation, temperature, or both. Some big sub-cases are: (a) in Mediterranean climates, e.g. California, ...


5

If the winds subsided and the flooding was caused purely by tidal effects, which are astronomical events, shouldn't it have been predictable months, if not years in advance? The tides are only partially caused by astronomical events. There's always some difference between predicted and observed tide levels. The former typically only use astronomical ...


5

Venice can't really be flooded by rivers, since there are none worth mentioning throughout the city. High tides are predictable, yes. Take a look at how Venice is situated. The historic city is sheltered behind low sandbanks/islands, which form the foremost coastline. Still the laguna is - obviously - connected to the open sea. Meaning: Huge waves, like in ...


5

I'm not sure it would be entirely liquefiable as the atmosphere gets thinner and thinner, but if we ignore that, then it's a simple matter of calculating density and ocean cover. 78% Nitrogen, 0.807 g/mL Source: Liquid Nitrogen 21% Oxygen, 1.141 g/mL Source: Liquid Oxygen Ignoring the 1% of trace gases, average density of liquefied air, 0.87 g/mL, or ...


5

1.Given the amount of water on Earth (including all the water as liquid, solid, and gas, in all possible places: the atmosphere, the surface, and underground), is there enough water to flood the whole earth until ‘all the high mountains… were covered’? Yes. According to Massive 'ocean' discovered towards Earth's core A reservoir of water three times the ...


5

We do get flooding in the Puget Sound lowlands, but it actually happens most often when a mid-winter warm front brings a moderate amount of rain to higher elevations, causing sudden, extensive snowmelt. Those weather systems, like one in February 2020 that caused quite a bit of flooding, suddenly raise temps by 15-20 degrees C (20-30 °F), and raise the snow/...


4

The geological, hydrological, meteorological, palaeontological, evolutionary and hydrodynamic absurdities of the literal reading of Noah's Flood could fill at least one lengthy book, in fact many such books, and are way too numerous to do justice in a short Stack Exchange article. The short answer is NO, one cannot even begin to explain the discrepancies ...


4

I'm sure a statistics guru over on cross-validated could answer this better for you, but here's some general info on estimating flood frequency fyi. The 100 year flood has a 1% probability of occurring in any given year. It is typically estimated by fitting some type of an extreme value distribution to observed flood peaks with additional skew adjustments ...


4

Waterlogging is a situation were soil is either fully or near saturated most of the time, the air phase is restricted and aerobic conditions prevail. Waterlogged soil may appear dry on the surface. The soil does not need to be submerged to be waterlogged. Flooding is a temporary submersion of land by water. The duration of a flood may be very short, such as ...


3

Hydrology major here, for whatever that's worth :) Some possibilities from my readings/internships: First I'd check the gage you're using for stage--if it's moved in the last 8 years, the stage may need to be correlated to what it would be at the former site. If it hasn't, it's more likely something changed in your stretch of channel. If the channel has ...


3

Because soil drainage would be higher and the ground would take long to saturate Floods don't always happen in Rainy weather all the time because first the soil needs to be saturated (the point where it filled up with water) then the rain needs to continue, Flash floods are mostly produced this way. So you would need lots of rain for a flood to occur in WA, ...


3

For a general view of the surge in the region, the maps in u-surge give a pretty good idea of numbers and more affected regions. The USGS provides a comprehensive view of High Water Marks (HWM) in the entire region. If you are looking for observations, then the HWM database gives you the best spatial coverage. While HWM do not provide surge information per ...


3

For the atmosphere to be so cold it turns to liquid, extreme Snowball Earth conditions would exist. Any atmospheric gases that would turn into liquids would form a layer on the frozen surface of the Earth, that includes any surface rock that may be exposed and frozen water from oceans, lakes, etc. This source, gives the amount of nitrogen and oxygen in the ...


3

As you noted, the (predictions about) impacts of global climate change are region specific. The general reasoning behind predictions for many regions are similar however, as are some noteworthy bottom lines (such as increased exposure to flooding as your question focuses on), so I'll try to summarize those from rich and reliable sources. The Maryland Sea ...


2

Without requiring any rainfall, if you accept a theoretical scenario of a "dead Earth", meaning with no more active tectonics, no flux of heat from the mantle/core and given a long-enough time to almost completely erode mountains, then yes, a complete global flood may be possible. Just imagine to displace all the rocks that today are above the average sea ...


2

My house elevation is 9.1 feet above sea level, according to all "expert" measurements. That includes the city, county, state, Feds, and all insurers. It seems about right to me. But then again, I cannot dunk. I live a half mile or so from the beach and bay of mustang island. Anyhoo, the static water level In my hood was 2-3 feet and a little less inside ...


2

If you're after "basic" academic work, I suggest the following 2003 textbook from the Utah State University entitled, "Rainfall Runoff Processes", chapter 2: Runoff Generation Mechanisms It looks like a pretty good compendium of what you're looking for with easy-to-understand text and clear diagrams. Further detail, if needed, can be found by hunting down ...


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