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3

It's basically a (rough) description of the relative wind speed on the site compared to the local average. If a site is sheltered, it will typically experience: lower wind speeds, potentially warmer mean temperatures, and (in temperate zones) a lower risk of frost (although some sites may actually have an increase due to catabatic airflow: "frost hollows") ...


3

A "highly tapering stem" is simply that the trunk of the tree is less cylindrical and more conical in profile. It's a problem because while you may have a lot of timber volume you don't have as much timber that is usable because you'll end up with a higher proportion of sawmill waste. I'm English and have a degree in forestry. Regardless of comments ...


-1

It means that the tree is thick at the base, but rapidly becomes thinner as it ascends. The use of "stem" is anomalous. An Englishman would speak of 'a highly tapering trunk'. Stem is used when referring to much smaller plants.


3

Depends on the context. Examples can be: In depressions instead of lonely on the plain, inside of the forest instead of at the edge, along a river bank or lakeside instead of on dry ground. Or, in short: exposed to wind & weather instead of sheltered from the rigour. Also depends on the tree. Some pioneer trees can grow individually in adverse ...


0

So, there's really two questions here. 1) if we were to take wood and store it in a way that prevents decomposition, would this help reduce atmospheric CO2? and 2) Would sinking it into the bottom of an ocean trench achieve this? So, first things first, yes removing wood from the contemporary carbon cycle does reduce atmospheric CO2. We already do this (...


46

I am an archaeologist and I specialize in the ancient Maya. Here's how it happens: 1: The vast majority of ancient Maya buildings are built using a "core and veneer" technique. The bulk of the building's volume is earth and stone rubble, faced with a veneer of nicely-shaped limestone blocks that are themselves covered by a layer of lime plaster (stucco). ...


2

Disclaimer: this answer is based on what I remember from school and TV. When a volcano erupts with lava flows, the magma cools and forms an inhospitable, sterile surface. The first life to colonise the rocky surface is lichens. When the lichens start dying, they decay into very thin soil layers. Next comes moss which needs a tiny bit of soil. The roots of ...


4

Most of the Mexican pyramids are less steep than their Egyptian counterparts, and have niches and terraces which their Egyptian counterparts don't. An important difference is the climate, which is much damper in Mexico, and shows how the rainforest can reclaim areas where it has been eradicated if the site is then abandoned. Yet another factor is the type of ...


15

The accumulation of soil in such situations takes a long time. The main way soil would have been naturally transported there would be by the wind. The wind blown soil would get caught and accumulate. Plants, particularly grasses, would grow on the soil and the plant roots would create mesh that would protect the soil from erosion. You are correct in that ...


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