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For thick steel like a pressure vessel with 12" thick walls ( not many but there are some) must leave some "fossil" evidence for a very ,very long time if buried. And there are many vessels with walls about 6 " thick. These vessels contain a little Cr and Mo so are somewhat more corrosion resistant than carbon steels. And very tall buildings are made with ...


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When we speak of a fossil, we don't usually mean a preserved object, but rather a preserved trace of an object, like it's impression in other material. Metal objects certainly would leave impressions in the surrounding material, as well as oxides. So in that sense they can easily leave fossils. Whether the steel artifact its self lasts for eons depends on ...


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It all depends on the conditions of fossilisation and the type of steel. Human flesh doesn't usually last long, but the Ice Man found cryogenically preserved in the Austrian Alps had been there for 5,000 years and would have been there for another few thousand if he hadn't been removed. Dinosaur proteins and DNA much older than that have been found. Iron ...


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The short answer is no. Most metals do not fossilize well, they are too reactive/water soluble. Metals are usually what is doing the fossilizing, dissolved metal in groundwater is being attracted to the electrical properties of organic material and filling in or swapping places with a porous material. You might have a stain left or some of the shape as a ...


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