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17 votes

Why is the temperature between the earth core and surface not distributed linearly?

The temperature does indeed increase with depth, something that is a problem in deep mines or deep drilling, but a benefit for geotermal heating. The heat originates mostly from radioactive decay, but ...
user2821's user avatar
  • 5,946
13 votes

How plausible is it that "a portion of the ocean's floor" could suddenly be "thrown up to the surface" as described in this Lovecraft story?

Generally the Earth's geology moves very slowly, ... very slowly. When people use the term geological time scales they mean a very long period of time, usually in the millions of years. In volcanic ...
Fred's user avatar
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12 votes
Accepted

Gaps in locations of volcanos (Peru & Chile)

As you said, the Andean belt is divided into four segments, usually called the northern, central, southern, and austral volcanic zones (NVZ, CVZ, SVZ and AVZ, respectively; your map lacks the AVZ). ...
Jean-Marie Prival's user avatar
11 votes

Are old geophysics textbooks useful?

Mathematics and computer science are exact sciences. If something is discovered and known, it is not wrong. With time, there may be better or new ways of doing something, but the old stuff is still ...
Gimelist's user avatar
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10 votes

How plausible is it that "a portion of the ocean's floor" could suddenly be "thrown up to the surface" as described in this Lovecraft story?

Very implausible. If your sailor is actually in the middle of the ocean, there are several kilometres of water underneath. Nothing that we know of can uplift kilometres of rock overnight, at least ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k
5 votes
Accepted

Can the sealed bottle garden be called a perpetual motion machine?

There are no perpetual motion machines. So when you think you've found one, you need to ask a couple of questions, because there will always be an answer to at least one of them. How is the ...
410 gone's user avatar
  • 4,080
5 votes
Accepted

How to define the force at the base of an oceanic crust

Your approach of adding all the forces together is correct. You have a mistake in in the solution of the $F_{oc}$ integral, though. You forgot to integrate the terms $\rho_{w}gh_{w}$ and $-\rho_{oc}...
ye-ti-800's user avatar
  • 413
5 votes
Accepted

How to calculate hydrostatic equilibrium?

I am assuming you are asking for the case of sea level being 200m higher and in isostatic equilibrium. In that case we can make use of Airy's isostasy model: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isostasy#...
ye-ti-800's user avatar
  • 413
4 votes
Accepted

why continents do not subduct

It is continental crust which hs the greater buoyancy, so when it meets another plate of continental crust neither can subduct. Instead, they collide, crumple and fold, making them thicker and higher. ...
Michael Walsby's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

How much change has there been to the shape of plate boundaries over geological time?

I am not sure if you are actually asking about Tectonic Plate boundaries, or the boundaries of continents, which are often described a puzzle pieces when teaching continental drift due to the way ...
C.Crumpet's user avatar
3 votes

Are old geophysics textbooks useful?

Every textbook written between about 1930 and say.....now, is pretty useless for your purposes. You'd be better served by watching many of those slick, university produced video lectures. They are ...
Knob Scratcher's user avatar
3 votes

How can we determine the size and composition of Earth's inner core?

The previous answers are correct in that geophysics and crust-mantle samples are the main tools for sorting out the composition of the core. In addition, don't forget that meteorites are the solid '...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
3 votes

How plausible is it that "a portion of the ocean's floor" could suddenly be "thrown up to the surface" as described in this Lovecraft story?

Putting a piece of oceanic crust on land is an existing geological process called obduction. However, it is not a sudden process, but rather a very slow one. Now, there is one process that can lift ...
Jean-Marie Prival's user avatar
2 votes

How plausible is it that "a portion of the ocean's floor" could suddenly be "thrown up to the surface" as described in this Lovecraft story?

The rock on the ocean floor is not likely to well up to the surface anytime soon. But methane can. Methane, formed from biological processes or decay of organic matter at sea bottoms, forms water-ice ...
Oscar Lanzi's user avatar
  • 3,946
2 votes

Is the concept of seismogenic zone still relevant after the 2011 Japan earthquake?

Tohoku is the seismogenic zone, the asperity model explained this small repeating earthquake well. It was said massive earthquake will occur in Nankai Trough. As their expectation was wrong, [Kato and ...
Takahiro Waki's user avatar
2 votes

Could the Earth's core lose its heat?

The earth produces 20TW[1] of thermal energy from radioactive decay in the mantle. This is the amount of warmth that the earth generates, so it should give us a ballpark idea of how much heat we would ...
CL4P-TP's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Does volcanic activity fluctuate?

It's reporting bias, and over longer time spans there's a preservation bias as well since a small eruption like Ruapehu 1995-96 will not show up in the fossil record at all after a few hundred years ...
Ash's user avatar
  • 4,550
1 vote

What equation should I use in this isostasy problem?

As this is a homework problem I don't think I can answer what you have posted. I think you have confused Airy's stress function with his concept of isotasy. For some helpful information to get you ...
verisimilidude's user avatar
1 vote

Phase relation for mantle?

Perple_X (http://www.perplex.ethz.ch/) is software designed to do exactly that. It has thermodynamic and mineral property databases for phases in interest. This is pretty much automation of method 3 ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k

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