50

It's the international date line and marks the boundary between the time zones that are +12 and -12 hours from UTC / Greenwich. It should follow the +/-180 degree meridian line, but zigs and zags to include territories or islands within a "day" thus the Aleutians islands are in the same time zone as the Hawaiian islands.


39

Mkennedy's answer is right at identifying that line as the international date line and explaining how it works. However, I'd like to add on the main weird points of the line. North to south: In the Bering sea, the line bends eastward to include all Russia in the same side, and then it bends westward to include the Aleutian islands on the same side as Alaska ...


31

Oasis are places where aquifers are connected to the surface. The source of the water in the aquifer however can be hundreds of miles away in areas that do get significant rainfall. The trick is geologic strat have different properties; some allow water to flow easily, others are very water tight, a water accessible layer covered by a water proof layer ...


14

There are two types of oases: natural and human made. Natural oases form when springs, created when underground aquifers allow fresh water to pool or flow on the ground surface of deserts, creating a fertile region. A human made oasis occurs when humans create fertile region in a dry or arid region, such as a desert. The supply of water in human made oases ...


12

I wrote a little Matlab script to estimate this approximatively. Here is the result: colour denotes the total land area inside the hemisphere centred on a particular surface point. The red point is the maximum. This gives me a maximum for the hemisphere centred on 1.7582°W longitude and 40.7692°N latitude, roughly in Guadalajara, Spain. If I calculated ...


9

I would assume that's the highest point on the equator you talking about, so The highest point on the Equator is at the elevation of 4,690 metres (15,387 ft), at 0°0′0″N 77°59′31″W, found on the southern slopes of Volcán Cayambe [summit 5,790 metres (18,996 ft)] in Ecuador. This is slightly above the snow line and is the only place on the Equator where snow ...


6

The total land area of earth is approximately 29%. So, in order to have a hemisphere with more land than water, out of 29% of total land area we need to have at least 25% of it concentrated in that hemisphere. Now for the ease of understanding, what does 25/29 of total land area means? It approximates to 86% of the total continental surface area. Area of ...


5

Considering it's now my profession as a geomatics technician, I don't really need a mnemonic technique to remember which is which, but when I first had to remember the orientation of latitude and longitude, I simply did this: Consider the equator as the horizon and switch two letters in latitude so it becomes altitude. There you go, latitude is the (...


4

Australia does get widely referred to as an island as well as as a continent - an island-continent sometimes. My understanding is that "continent" in terms of geology refers to the largest land mass of a continental plate and is more a matter of convention - a general agreement - than precise definition. Such definitions have been subject to revision. This ...


4

After quite some research it turns out these are EPSG:3857 WGS 84 / Pseudo-Mercator coordinates. I found this out by visiting this website where you can transform coordinates from different systems.


3

The visibility or "clearness" is more a matter of suspended particulates, and organic material such as algae, than of dissolved material. For instance, runoff from glacial streams can be nearly opaque due to suspended rock flour, yet "pure" in the common sense of not having much in the way of algae &c. Conversely, some parts of the oceans can be very ...


3

There is a similar and bigger chalk plateau at "plateau d'urle" in France. That one looks like a "chalk plateau of continental shelf origin with straight channels eroded into the underlying clays", by it's flatness and proximity to the sea. The geologists write that the chalk is a freshwater lake chalk deposit due to it's fossils. The sediments are layed ...


3

There are a couple of possibilities, depending on what you're paying the most attention to. This falls in an overlap area of terms that vary from region to region and even from person to person. The key thing to notice in your photo is the whitish band running along the top of the escarpment that borders your landform. This shows that it's held up by a ...


3

TL;DR: It depends on how one defines land area. With a sensible definition, such a meridian (along with its completion on the other side of the globe) must necessarily exist by virtue of the intermediate value theorem. The same goes for the line of latitude. Defining the functions $\operatorname{A}_{\text{E}}(\lambda)$ is the area of the land projected ...


2

Easiest method I use is "Lat(itude) = Fat(itude)", imagining left-to-right lines of latitude looking like a fat belly (or belt) protruding over a tight belt. That does the trick, but as a secondary mnemonic, I then imagine "Long" as a measure of tall/lankiness, as I'd never describe fatness/width as "long".


2

Found in https://twitter.com/amazingmap I can't personally vouch for accuracy. From tweet, several complaints about Antarctica, "wrong pole", etc. New favourite map projection. Hellereal Boreal Triaxial Projection From tweet World Mercator map projection with true country size and shape added #Map #Maps #Amazingmap #Amazingmaps #Mercator


2

If the flat land formed as a river terrace, we could call it a raised terrace. If the flat land is a resistant layer of rock, then we could call it a low plateau. (the thin layer of white rock immediately below the land surface might suggest this is the correct interpretation.) If it formed by erosion in the past, it could be a peneplain. The correct ...


2

It's basically a (rough) description of the relative wind speed on the site compared to the local average. If a site is sheltered, it will typically experience: lower wind speeds, potentially warmer mean temperatures, and (in temperate zones) a lower risk of frost (although some sites may actually have an increase due to catabatic airflow: "frost hollows") ...


2

The lake is very clean and pure by the standards of some other lakes, but there are bound to be some harmless and beneficial impurities in there. The plants couldn't grow unless there was plenty of CO2 in the water, and it follows there is also oxygen. Nitrogen is dissolved from the air and nitrogen oxides are brought in by the rain. I would be very ...


2

No, it isn't possible for cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, which are all different names for the same thing, to form over land. Storms can form over land, but not hurricanes, which draw their power from the sun-warmed ocean and rapidly lose their strength when they hit land. The power of a typical hurricane is immense, probably in excess of 50 megatons, ...


2

I believe the lake shown in the YouTube video Adventure Oregon - Lost Lake draining into a giant hole is the exact same lake. That is incorrect, and that incorrect hypothesis resulted in a lot of incorrect reasoning. These are not the same lake. They are however close to one another. I apologize for being so harsh. Lost Lake is a shallow, transient lake ...


2

tl;dr I would suggest considering the borehole measurements as a vertical profile. In terms of the CF Convention it would be a featureType profile, which is described in the discrete sampling geometries section. I didn't include all reference to the relevant sections in the CF Conventions below. Just comment if import things are missing. Example netCDF ...


1

The Citarum River, originates in Situ Cisanti located at the foot of Mount Wayang, which lies to the south of the city of Bandung, and travels to the north until it empties into the Java Sea. Situ Cisanti is a artificial lake, about 5 to 10 ha in size, depending on which sources one reads. It is fed by seven springs: Citarum, Cikoleberes, Cikahuripan, ...


1

Your marker seems to indicate an escarpment, which is a long ridge where a cliff or a steep slope separates low ground from higher ground. These slopes or cliffs can have a number of different causes, but as I have never visited the one in your photo I wouldn't like to hazard a guess as to what caused this particular one.


1

You're right about Mount Kenya, which is more or less on the equator and is about 5,000 metres above sea level. Mount Kinabalu in northern Borneo (Malaysia) is also on the equator, but only 4,000 metres high. Kilimanjaro, next door to Kenya in Tanzania, is about 6,ooo metres, but further from the equator than Mount Kenya


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