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8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_regolith_simulant#MGS-1 has a link to a standard for Martian regolith that includes recipes. It will, though, not be trivial to replicate the grain size from the minerals. Silicate stuff is hard, one might need an expensive mill or grinder to produce it, or a friend who works at a stonecutter's workshop. Perchlorates are ...


3

My understanding of supergene is that it is about mineral enrichment/concentration at the base of an oxidized zone, within a weathered profile. The seasonal/periodic rise and fall of the local water table is critical to supergene enrichment. The descending meteoric waters oxidize the primary (hypogene) sulfide ore minerals and redistribute the metallic ...


3

Just as there are many different rocks and soils on Earth, so there are many different rocks and soils on Mars. To reproduce a Martian soil, you need to bear two things in mind. Firstly it should have all the vital nutrients plants need to grow, and secondly it should have no component of biological origin. That rules out limestone for a start. Your soil ...


2

What you can see in the bottom picture is sandstone/mudstone/claystone. If you look at the bottom picture top right you can see a thin rock that has split off, this is how a rock splits after it has been heated and then suddenly gets cooled down as it does on Mars when the Sun goes down. On Earth the change in temperature is too slow for this to happen in ...


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Molten rock must be a liquid, mobile rock is any rock capable of moving, sand and mud can be mobile.


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In your question I think you are mixing up metamorphic conditions such as the conditions that gneiss forms from sedimentary rock with the formation of diapirs. Diapirs occur where a less dense layer of a relatively plastic rock has denser overlying formations create sufficient pressure so that the less dense substance deforms and rises over time. Diapirs ...


1

I don't see anything wrong with Supergenic. It is widely understood and includes weathering. I would stick to Supergenic if I were you. You probably realise that there are some rocks which, as they are produced in more than one way, would fit into several of your classification headings. There is no way of avoiding this. Quartz, for example, can be magmatic, ...


1

I believe the author's was referring to phenomena like salt diapirs (where mobile salt deposits intrude into heavier overlying sediments). These produce low hills in the gulf coast region of the United States. The salt that is moving is not liquid, it is merely mobile. I do not believe the author of the book you reference was referring to sand and mud ...


1

If you enlarge the picture and follow a line at 1 o'clock from the weirdly shaped piece in question, a few feet away from it at the back of an imaginary 'man's head' rock, you will see a similar convoluted piece. Now follow a line at 10 o'clock from our original specimen, and also a few feet away is a longer,straighter piece in the process of eroding from ...


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Very unlikely, especially as the major industrial nations will come nowhere near to meeting their greenhouse gases emission targets. Major volcanic eruptions, like major earthquakes, are random and unpredictable. The last really big volcanic eruption we had was Tambora, on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa in 1815. That caused climate cooling for a few years, ...


1

In short, weird things happen when you combine things that don't combine in nature: the Earth is a perfect sphere the Earth is spinning on an axis Einstein's equivalence principle tells us that accelerations are all the same, no matter what's causing them. So you just add the acceleration vectors up. The (real) Earth has an equatorial bulge because a ...


1

If the Earth were a perfect ball, which it is not, and had a perfectly smooth and even surface with no basins or irregularities, water would tend to move toward the equator, where it would form a bulge. Meanwhile, gravity would be pulling on this bulge and trying to drag it down, thus preventing it getting any higher and stopping the flow of water into it. ...


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Why would you limit yourself? You could just go to a regular university and enroll in the geology degree program. In some countries (like Germany) you would then only take courses necessary to become a geologist (including the math and physics you need to understand for it). In some other countries (e.g, the United States) you'd have to take other courses ...


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