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2

It is probably not ideal and misleading. Nomenclature first: I have been in several universities, both in the English speaking and non-English speaking world. I also attended multple international conferences. I have never seen the term "Tardimagmatic". Ever. Also, your "Exogenous" is much more commonly referred to as "supergene". That said, most minerals ...


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A genetic classification. Endogenic: Magmatic, Metamorphic, Hydrothermal Exogenic: Supergene, Sedimentary For more on this please see Wenk, H. R., & Bulakh, A. (2016). Minerals: their constitution and origin. Cambridge University Press (second edition) or the first edition of this book(2004).


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The height of Everest above its base depends on where one considers its base to be - and this depends on which side of the mountain one looks. According to Wikipedia, reasonable base elevations for Everest range from 4,200 m (13,800 ft) on the south side to 5,200 m (17,100 ft) on the Tibetan Plateau, yielding a height above base in the range of 3,650 ...


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The 1954 recorded height of 8,848 m remains the accepted figure for height. As for the elevation of Everest's base, it is 5,380 m (at 17,600 ft).


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Typically we are not answering Rock Id questions, though this is a somewhat unique question because the rock is unique. Your rock is likely a tufa (never heard it called tuffy). It is a rock that is formed when water with high carbonate content is released to the surface. Depending on the conditions at the surface the dissolved carbonate comes out of ...


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