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Up to now, we constrained the (relative) plate movements mostly with seismic slip measurments. Since 10-20 years, with the diffusion of GPS measurments, it has been possible to have a more granular distribution of movements and a more precise estimation of the rotation pole for a given plate. Roughly speaking, then, you should look for the work of authors ...


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tl;dr I would suggest considering the borehole measurements as a vertical profile. In terms of the CF Convention it would be a featureType profile, which is described in the discrete sampling geometries section. I didn't include all reference to the relevant sections in the CF Conventions below. Just comment if import things are missing. Example netCDF ...


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As a student in petrology, I would say first you need to know if you gonna cut one thin slice out of this stone/rock, and this is usually how we identify an unknown rock. If so, you can refer to “A Key for Identification of Rock-Forming Minerals in Thin Section” by Andrew J. Barker to get a formal rock identification by observing thin section under optical ...


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Is there such a reliable source so I can identify the stones by myself? Maybe. Most semi-precious stones are various forms of quartz or silica (e.g., agate, citrine, etc). Quartz is very hard and will scratch glass. It is hard to scratch quartz. Therefore, this is a non-destructive way for identification of quartz. It usually takes a really good polish ...


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mindat.org - * my fav as an avid rockhound/gem junkie USGS.gov geology.com TreasureNet is cool - you send pic (good) in app and the guy returns PDQ *p.s. --- dont forget *specific gravity test


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It depends on what purpose you need the data for. This site https://wiki.seg.org/wiki/Open_data gives several sources of data. If it must be land acquisition (as opposed to marine) data then the Poland 2D, Teapot dome 3D, or Stratton 3D surveys might be of interest. These free data sets are for pedagogical/research purposes, so if you'd like to 'strike-...


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The short answer is no, because we always have some constraint of how old something is. Sometimes we have fossils with large date error bars, and often we do not know for how long that species existed. A large date range constraint in some cases, like archeology, might not be useful. If the specimen is taken without noting the location it was taken from, ...


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