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The short answer: cubic cleavage is a specific example of 3D cleavage. A cleavage plane is a direction along a crystal splits preferentially when exposed to mechanical stress. 3D crystals are objects where the spatial arrangement of atoms is described in a parallelepiped (a unitcell) with three outer dimensions $\vec{a}$, $\vec{b}$, and $\vec{c}$. The ...


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There are two water-related erosional process at work here: The exhumation of main sandstone blocks caused by heavy rainfall, incising channels and carrying away the loose debris for deposition elsewhere as "sand". Formation of weather resistant surfaces caused by dissolution and re-precipation of iron-rich minerals. You often see this process ...


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You are referring to shale "boudins": sausage-like structures that form when rock layers are compacted, break apart, and are pinched at the ends by differential compaction stresses: Their formation has nothing in common with how salt is deformed by stress. Salt is deformed by stress induced erosion and re-mineralization at grain boundary edges. It ...


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Tracking atmospheric species over the entire planet really is comparatively easy via satellites, compared to plastering entire swathes of land with measurement stations. You make one infrared image from an imaging satellite at the right wavelength and you got the entire country covered. The right wavelength to choose has to be originating from the molecule ...


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The quantities of oil in a deposit are listed under two categories: resources and reserves. Resources are deposits that could be converted to reserves if economic factors, prices and costs, were favorable. Reserves are deposits that can be extracted for a profit. What makes a deposit profitable involves many things: The size of the deposit The quality of ...


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https://products.kitsapsun.com/archive/1998/11-19/0016_extinction__piece_of_dinosaur-kil.html Here you go. Its amazing to see what happened to Earth, at the end of the Mesazoic.


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The outer banks are, literally, a textbook example of what are known as Barrier Islands. They are thought to be formed through interactions between sediment undergoing longshore drift, coastal currents and seabed irregularities, but to spite a number of theories being put forward since the 19th Century we really don't understand their formation. We do know ...


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