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You didn't dive deep enough. You're asking about an area on a high-level, generalized map of basement rock provinces. There were several orogenies at the southern boundary of the Wyoming craton. Between 1800 Ma and 1000 Ma, a series of island arcs accreted to southern Laurentia, building up the pink area on your map. The earliest of these was the Yavapai ...


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The interpretation of most of these interfaces is uncertain. Most of these plate boundaries are ancient, poorly exposed, have been metamophosed in later orogenies, and have suffered significant amounts of later erosion making it very difficult to say too much about the earlier character of the contact. Theoretically, you could have a transform fault that ...


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Short answer, there are various estimates, with large uncertainties, ranging from 4 to 7 million km2. Pulling from the link provided by Keith McClary in the comments: Estimating the original extent of the Traps is difficult, given the likely erosion over the last 250 Ma. This is especially important for the relatively easily eroded pyroclastic deposits. ...


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I think the shortest fair answer is there are no special prerequisites beyond a general, high-school-level education in maths and science. It's a difficult question to answer directly, because petroleum geoscience is a very broad field including: Geology: the study of sedimentary basins, especially sources rocks, reservoirs rocks, and structural geology (...


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A crystal, is a solid material whose constituents (such as atoms, molecules, or ions) are arranged in a highly ordered microscopic structure, forming a crystal lattice that extends in all directions. Microscopically, a single crystal has atoms in a near-perfect periodic arrangement; a polycrystal is composed of many microscopic crystals (called "...


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Would it sink down to a certain altitude based on how hollow the geode is or would it float on top or sink to the bottom? Most geodes are made of quartz or calcite. Their densities are somewhere between 2.6 and 2.7 g/cm3. Let's round it up to 3 for simplicity. This is three times the density of water. So, for a geode to float it needs to be at least two ...


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In order to equilibrate a geode with the ocean, there must be a location where the density of the water matches that of the geode including the latter's enclosed empty space. But water in the oceans is very near to an incompressible fluid; its density varies only over a very narrow range. Thus if a geode (or a sinking ship) is dense enough to sink at all ...


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The earth condensed from gas into liquid into solid. Rocks are assumed to be solids and not a fluid part of a melt. Bowens Reaction Series implies that the first rocks on earth would have been Olivine Polymorphs. MgSiO3-perovskite and MgO (periclase) are likely candidates from observations at the Earths Moho. As far as the "rock cycle" goes; these ...


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