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42 votes
Accepted

Where on Earth is the magnetic field intensity stronger?

If we consider only the magnetic field generated by natural sources, and not the ones generated by human activities. The general trend is that higher intensities of the magnetic field happen close to ...
Camilo Rada's user avatar
  • 17.7k
19 votes
Accepted

Is it possible that the geomagnetic field reversal led to the extinction of Dinosaurs?

Mark's answer is correct, but in my opinion is not clear enough. Let's make it a bit simpler: Is it possible that the geomagnetic field reversal led to the extinction of Dinosaurs? NO, DEFINITELY ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k
14 votes
Accepted

What is the nature of the "unexpected geomagnetic pulse that took place beneath South America in 2016"?

The "geomagnetic pulse" here refers to a series of academic works studying the Earth's core such as this open access article (other related articles require scientific journal subscriptions to read). ...
WJB's user avatar
  • 1,041
14 votes

Does Earth's magnetic field arise from a fission reactor in its core?

The conventional explanation for the Earth's magnetic field is that some combination of differential rotation and/or convection occurs in the Earth's outer core, primarily in molten iron-nickel (+ ...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
13 votes

Is it possible that the geomagnetic field reversal led to the extinction of Dinosaurs?

It's a commonly-proposed theory that geomagnetic reversals cause extinction events, but there's no evidence for it. There aren't enough mass extinction events for any sort of statistical analysis, ...
Mark's user avatar
  • 1,261
13 votes

Where on Earth is the magnetic field intensity stronger?

Since it is not specified in the question (and to complement the other answer), the strongest magnetic fields on Earth are not naturally generated, but artificially. The current world record holder ...
Graipher's user avatar
  • 331
12 votes

How long does a magnetic pole reversal take to complete?

The entire process appears to take 3,000-4,000 years, according to Valet and Fournier's May 2016 review article "Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals," which was published in AGU's Reviews of ...
jeffronicus's user avatar
  • 3,486
10 votes
Accepted

Does a geomagnetic storm visibly deflect a compass?

You can definitely see a large geomagnetic storm with a compass, if you have the timing to catch one and the patience to sit and stare for a few minutes. If you look at these minutely measurements ...
WJB's user avatar
  • 1,041
8 votes
Accepted

Does Magnetic Deviation depend on altitude?

Technically yes, but practically, usually no. The magnetic field varies in three dimensions and the variations are not parallel to the Earth's surface. However, horizontal distances varies usually ...
user2821's user avatar
  • 5,946
6 votes

Why are pole reversals not more detrimental to life?

There are several factors to consider. The main one is the atmosphere (especially if you want to compare Mars with the Earth's during magnetic reversals). Earth's atmosphere is a formidable shield ...
Camilo Rada's user avatar
  • 17.7k
6 votes
Accepted

What happens when the North and South poles flip?

First of all I will try to explain what a geomagnetic pole reversal is. A magnetic pole reversal happens when the magnetic field weakens until it can no longer sustain itself. This can take 1000-3000 ...
trond hansen's user avatar
  • 1,886
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a "submerged object" in Australia that causes a magnetic deviation of 20 degrees?

I'll disagree with Camilo Rada's answer, and show that there is definitely a magnetic anomaly. We start with the interactive geophysics map of Geoscience Australia, Australia's federal geoscience ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k
5 votes

Is there a "submerged object" in Australia that causes a magnetic deviation of 20 degrees?

The Mount Jim in your map seem to be the one located at 36° 55' 17" S and 147° 13' 01" E. Although, magnetic anomalies are not mapped over the whole worlds, the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map ...
Camilo Rada's user avatar
  • 17.7k
5 votes

What "blobs" of molten material in Earth's interior are responsible for the rapidly moving north pole? Where are these blobs exactly?

The "blobs" referred to in the IFLS article are, more correctly, areas of strong magnetic flux at the Earth's surface. The term "blob" is not scientifically significant, it just refers to a region ...
WJB's user avatar
  • 1,041
4 votes
Accepted

Where on Earth is the highest none polar magnetic fields?

In other words where might be a natural place on Earth that would over power a compass and then some Just about anywhere where the rocks are rich in iron. This would occur near iron ore, basalt, ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k
4 votes

What is the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at McMurdo Station, Antarctica?

According to the current World Magnetic Model 2015 v2 (new one to be released on 10 December 2019!), ...
mkennedy's user avatar
  • 735
4 votes

How long does a magnetic pole reversal take to complete?

As per our numerical calculations it takes about ~1000 years to completely flip the dynamo, that being said the current models are not even close to the actual parameters in the earth's core because ...
Gaurav Dhama's user avatar
4 votes

Is there evidence of multiple poles (higher order than dipole) in earth's magnetic field?

It's common for dynamo models to predict a large reduction in the dipole field during a reversal. Proving it in the paleomagnetic record is another matter entirely. To characterize the geometry of the ...
A. Newell's user avatar
  • 288
4 votes

Do gravity and magnetic field change along a geographic latitude or not?

They can both change along any direction. Here's Earth's magnetic field strength in early 2014, from ESA via NASA. And here's Earth's gravitational field strength courtesy of NASA's GRACE satellite. ...
damp_civil's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why doesn't the Earth's magnetic field go through its center

They might mean a couple of things, hard to know exactly without context: The origin of the majority of Earth's magnetic field is in the fluid outer core, while the solid inner core (the centre) is ...
WJB's user avatar
  • 1,041
3 votes
Accepted

If the Earth's core were made up of copper/other metals other than iron-nickel alloy, what would the magnetosphere be like?

On a quick approach: Magnetism. The copper itself have a weak magnetism, so a copper core will not create a magnetosphere. Chek here or here. Gravity. The Iron density is 7.874 g/cm³ and the nickel ...
David García Bodego's user avatar
3 votes

How does liquid iron create a magnetic field?

It seems your question assumes that Earth magnetic field is caused by natural magnets inside the Earth. Instead, the magnetic field comes from the movement of charged particles. Any electrical charged ...
Santiago's user avatar
  • 596
3 votes

Where do the electric charge carriers for the current for earth's magnetic field come from?

Although Temperature boundary conditions at the mantle do affect the dynamo that sustains itself in the earth's core, it is unlikely that the dynamo's genesis came out of polarized regions in the ...
Gaurav Dhama's user avatar
3 votes

How probable is it that Earth's magnetic field will change 180 degrees at once?

Having worked on this problem myself in my master's thesis, see our paper in geophysical journal international(GJI) at http://ceas.iisc.ernet.in/~bsreeni/gji14.pdf the likely timeframe of this event ...
Gaurav Dhama's user avatar
3 votes

Are Helium 3 and 4 being produced by earth's core?

Are Helium 3 and 4 being produced by earth's core? tl;dr no. The paper you are referring to has major flaws in it. Claims that should not be in any respectable scientific journal such as: ...the ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Lights associated with earthquakes?

I am not too much into the subject, but it is a curious phenomenon indeed. There is a recent publication in Scientific Reports (Enomoto et al., 2017) where a group of scientists performed some lab ...
ValeVolc's user avatar
3 votes

How close to the magnetic poles will a compass be accurate?

Regions where the strength of the horizontal component (H) of the magnetic field is small (i.e. where the field is close to vertical near the magnetic poles) define where a compass won't work reliably....
WJB's user avatar
  • 1,041
3 votes

Do we know anything about the nature of Earth's core that hasn't come from magnetic or seismic measurements?

I think the answer is 'no', in the sense that 'seismology (i.e., the study of waves propagating within the Earth) tells us the details in a far superior way'. See this paper for an informative ...
Erik's user avatar
  • 1,999
3 votes
Accepted

Do we know anything about the nature of Earth's core that hasn't come from magnetic or seismic measurements?

Are there any other measurements that have contributed to current understanding of Earth's core besides these two? The answer is of course "yes". Other answers have already alluded to ...
David Hammen's user avatar
  • 23.7k

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