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I searched the mentioned earthquake, and if i understood it right it is attributed to a fault line formed by two laterally moving crustal units (a "normal fault"). Mount Kinabara itself is not to blame, though the earthquake triggered landslides as secondary effects at its steep flanks. I also found papers on the geological history of the area that offer ...


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Iceland isn't only situated on a divergent boundary (which in itself can rise up to shallow depths because of higher static and dynamic lift btw.) but also on a (postulated) pretty deep rooted mantle plume that may produce enough magma to rise to subaerial heights. Edit: The magma that erupts at an ocean ridge is "welded" to the sides ("sheeted dykes"). ...


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The reason islands don't form along divergent plate boundaries is that these boundaries are at the bottom of the sea, and usually quite deep. Although mid ocean ridges are volcanic, the magma doesn't get a chance to pile up and reach the surface because the plates are not static. They are slowly spreading apart, and the magma is needed to form fresh oceanic ...


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The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are neither orogenic or volcanic in origin. They are in fact an accretionary wedge, i.e. an accretion of sediments and oceanic crust "scraped" from the subducting Indian plate. See for instance the description in the first chapter of the aptly titled The Andaman–Nicobar Accretionary Ridge: The islands are an exposed segment ...


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The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are partly volcanic in origin. This volcanism is caused by the subduction of the Indo-Australian Plate beneath the Burman Plate, which is an extension of the much larger Sunda plate to the east. This produces large scale volcanism throughout the Indonesian Archipelago as well as the Andamans, but is too far away from Borneo to ...


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