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A DuckDuckGo search for "Zoeppritz matrix" gives the Wikipedia entry for "Zoeppritz equations" as the second link. The Wikipedia entry says: A full derivation of these equations can be found in most exploration geophysics text books, such as: Sheriff, R. E., Geldart, L. P., (1995), 2nd Edition. Exploration Seismology. Cambridge University Press.


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This is an interesting question that is maybe a little misguided. Instead of answering your question directly I'd like to draw your attention to some things that might get you to rethink your reasoning. It turns out that what you're thinking of as the lower mantle (an assemblage of solid phases: mainly bridgmanite + ferropericlase + some other stuff) might ...


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That seems way too low, even for crustal rocks. Recall: Vp = sqrt[(K + 4G/3)/𝜌] If you have a rough idea of the mineralogy of the rock (you do if you know that it's andesite or rhyolite), you can estimate the bulk modulus (K) and shear modulus (G) with a Voigt-Reuss-Hill average and use a reasonable density value (maybe 2500 kg/m^3) to get a reasonable ...


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I don't think neutrinos will be much good for mapping the interior of the Earth, the reason being that they rarely interact with matter and are said to be able to pass through 11 light years of solid lead without being stopped (though I would take that claim with a pinch of salt). However, so many pass through the Earth from the other side that a tiny ...


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This is a very complex question, for reasons I shall explain. Firstly. we need to establish what gases there are in the atmosphere before we worry about how much is dissolved in the ocean. Argon deserves a mention at 1 percent, and there are a few other gases in trace amounts, some of them more abundant than methane, some less, but as, like neon, they are ...


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