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This question might be more appropriate for the SE Engineering site. The thing about soils is that they vary from place to place. Some are sandy, some contain more clay than others and the thicknesses of layers is also variable. All this influences how different soils react to surface loading stresses, such as from building foundations/footings. ...


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Heavy buildings can sometimes be supported by piles going down to the bedrock beneath, but a popular and cheaper solution nowadays is the use of piled-raft foundations. This consists of a slab of reinforced concrete covering the entire footprint of the building, thus spreading the load, and this slab (or raft) is supported by numerous concrete piles below it ...


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This is a large glacier calving event. Calving occur at the front of the glacier, probably a very wet (and likely warm based) glacier where a considerable amount of water is flowing out of the system (thus from the glacier to the sea). The amount of water is important as it can accelerate the ice flow speed on the valley floor, enabling the breaking of big ...


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The terrain in the photo is a glacier. There have been a number of incidents since early in World War 2 where aircraft have crashed into or attempted to land on glaciers in the Andes or Greenland, usually with catastrophic results. The aircraft concerned were usually large, multi-engine bombers or airliners. Occasionally there were a few survivors. With ...


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Yes. So far as aquifers are concerned, Antarctica is just like any other continent. The Ice is 4 kilometres thick in places, but at the bottom there is water. If there is any place where water is not found at the base of the ice sheet, there will be an aquifer within a few miles. There are about 400 sub-glacial lakes in Antarctica, the most well known being ...


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