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35

Does human body temperature impact climate change? Directly? It's not even a blip. The Earth's population is 7.6 billion. With each person radiating about 80 watts (basal metabolism), that's about 600 gigawatts, or 760 gigawatts using a round figure of 100 watts. That sounds like a lot, but it's only a tiny fraction of the 18 terawatts consumed by humanity, ...


31

Part 1, see Neos answer. Earth will lose its heat no matter what we do, and our extraction of geothermal energy is insignificant (Wikipedia quotes a BP figure of 11.4 GW electrical, 28 GW heating). To answer part 2 of your question: if the Earth's core loses its heat, this will not have a major direct impact on climate. Internal heat generation is ...


26

Firstly it is worth demonstrating that 97% of climate scientists agree that climate-warming trends over the past century are very likely due to human activities. W. R. L. Anderegg, “Expert Credibility in Climate Change,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Vol. 107 No. 27, 12107-12109 (21 June 2010); DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1003187107. P. T....


26

Yep, mining can trigger earthquakes. According to a Scientific American article: We've been monitoring [The Geysers] since 1975. All the earthquakes we see there are [human] induced. When they move production into a new area, earthquakes start there, and when they stop production, the earthquakes stop. This is talking about geothermal power. They create ...


23

The short answer is yes, it's possible. And it can also reduce harm. Summary of the changes Here's a brief summary of the changes that happen when electricity is generated from a wind turbine, rather than from a fossil or nuclear plant: energy is taken out of the wind further upwind than it would otherwise be there is more turbulence just downwind from ...


21

The definitive place to start is the Summary for Policy Makers at the start of the IPCC AR5 Working Group 1 on the physical science basis of climate change. This also acts as a suitable introduction to the massive rest of the physical basis report, and will, together with the contents table for the full report, enable a reader to quickly find the sections ...


19

This question is relevant, Why is the inside of the Earth so hot? The short answer is the core is losing heat no matter what we do. You see, heat is transported from the core to the surface, but its important to think of heat in terms of energy. Since there is a finite amount of energy within the earth, we are actually transferring energy from the inside to ...


18

Put a frying pan on a stove burner and make the pan hot. Measure its temperature every minute over half an hour or so to get an idea of how rapidly it naturally cools. Then start the experiment over again. This time, take a needle and touch and hold its tip to the frying pan so that it acts as a heat sink. The relative sizes of frying pan and needle will ...


17

The Short Answer is Yes. The consensus is that humans can prematurely trigger earthquakes, and this paper in 1986's EPSL annual reviews seems to be in full support. There is also this paper which suggests that mining induced earthquakes are quite common. A third paper published in Science last year also suggests that hydraulic fracking can cause earthquakes. ...


15

They are not perfectly straight. Making them with modern GPS equipment should not be too difficult, you just keep a fixed distance to the previous line. They are only 5-6 meters wide. Googling for cape juby tarfaya sand beach experiment I found this 16 Jan 2013 entry from the blog An overland adventure mentioning: "Between the road and the sea is another ...


14

Could all the drilling and digging to use the earth's natural heat as geothermal energy be affecting Earth's core, causing it to cool down? Yes. But by how much? Let's do some rough math. We'll just be concerned with orders of magnitude here. Suppose we have a uniform sphere the size of the Earth. Call it 1021 cubic meters. Suppose this sphere is made ...


13

... causing it to cool down? This answer to the question 'Why has Earth's core not become solid?' over on Physics seems to claim the answer is no. The core is heated by radioactive decays of Uranium-238, Uranium-235, Thorium-232, and Potassium-40, all of which have half-lives of greater than 700 million years (up to about 14 billion years for Thorium). ...


13

Some background. The idea of towing ice bergs to provide a source for fresh water in dry climate zones was first proposed in the 1970s by Weeks and Campbell (1973) and Hult and Ostrander (1973). This sparked interest that resulted in several studies published in conferences (Husseiny, 1980; IGS, 1980). The focus of the work was manly on the wastage of ice ...


13

Those are Yap Traditional Fish Weirs, according to islandculture.info In 2008, Yap State Historic Preservation Office (YSHPO) commenced a project to survey the fish weirs (aech) around the main island of Yap. The aech is a stone/rock structure, usually in the shape of an arrow (many have a shaft, some do not), that catch fish after they move ...


11

We had a surprising opportunity to study this very question during the period of September 11-14, 2001, when all air traffic was grounded across the United States. The research was inconclusive, but they found that there was a 1.8 degree celsius increase across the US during this time frame compared to the three days before and after that time frame. ...


11

All mass used in construction on Earth comes from material on Earth. Since mass is conserved, there is no change. If we start harvesting material from the moon or asteroids for use in construction on Earth, then there would be a net increase in mass. But currently, the net mass of Earth has decreased due to man, since we have launched many satellites into ...


10

The East Midlands region of the UK is currently experiencing small earthquakes that are believed to be related to mining activities. The British Geological Survey has a page about these events: New Ollerton Earthquake Activity.


10

An excellent book that concisely summarizes the IPCC physical results (without much of the policy summary editorializing) is Global Warming, Understanding the Forecast by David Archer, 2nd ed 2011. There will presumably be an updated edition soon to cover the latest IPCC release.


10

The average ecological footprint of a US citizen has been estimated as 8.00 global ha. Multiplying 8.5 million by 8.00 hectare gives 680,000 km², or around 5 times the area of New York state. Of course, this calculation contains a lot of assumptions and simplifications. This doesn't mean you could simply allocate 680,000 km² around New York City and use ...


8

You have an economics and statistics background - is it anywhere near mathematical economics resp. mathematical statistics? If so, you could spend hours over at The Science of Doom: Roadmap. I would consider that thorough on the rigorous part. (As an economist, you know the difference between the laws at work, as opposed to the econometrics that attempt at ...


8

The sudden and recent occurrence of multiple earthquakes in Oklahoma is due to a widespread redistribution of stresses within the ground, particularly at depth. Installing large pipes underground for storm water, waste water, or potable water or even digging a basement under every house in an entire city will only cause a very minor localized redistribution ...


8

This has been tried to some extent; Strata in London was a skyscraper that was built with three wind turbines at the top, with a deliberate design to funnel wind into them. There are other examples. Siting renewable energy generation in cities is very attractive, partly because many people feel that the "industrial" feel fits better there, but also because ...


8

I think you have drawn the 'short straw'! As disasters go, volcanoes have about the least to do with human activity. Basically, volcanoes are the product of plate tectonics, which operates on a scale vastly greater than human impacts on the planet. At least one book has been written about earthquakes, volcanoes and human impacts, but the linkage is tenuous ...


7

Prof. Raymond Pierrehumbert's book the Principles of Planetary Climate is a pretty good primer on the physics that drives climate. I'm not too sure that the mainstream scientific view on anthropogenic climate change needs any more defense than say the mainstream scientific position on relativity, or any other scientific topic. @EnergyNumbers suggestion of ...


7

Taming hurricanes with arrays of offshore wind turbines Nature Climate Change 4, 195–200 (2014) It finds that large turbine arrays (300+ GW installed capacity) may diminish peak near-surface hurricane wind speeds by 25–41 m s−1 (56–92 mph) and storm surge by 6–79%. In the case of offshore turbine arrays in particular locations there is potential benefit ...


7

Raising herd animals would likely contribute more than mere farms. Many farms simply produce feed for animals anyway, and this can lead to an inflated population which can wreck havoc when released in the wild to graze. That said, with the exception of Egypt and a few rare cases, every agricultural society eventually failed because they could either could ...


7

The idea of trying to limit energy released by earthquakes and the damage that may result via the use of controlled smaller blast induced quakes is an interesting idea. One of the problems with this is that we don't know enough about the snags along faults that cause stresses to accumulate during the normal movements along a fault. We also don't know enough ...


7

They look like stone fish traps or weirs. They are used by native poeple to catch fish on a large scale. They can actually vary quite a bit by culture and can be quite large. Here is a stone and wood one with the same shape


7

Don't confuse redistribution of mass with gain/loss of mass. There's a net loss of hydrogen and helium from the uppermost tenuous atmosphere. This far outweighs the incoming meteorites and miscellaneous space dust - by some 50,000 to 90,000 tonnes per year. Both of these components eclipse, by orders of magnitude, the loss of mass from radioactive decay, ...


7

I'm assuming here that you're asking whether you can apply the term ‘erosion’ to the damage your stone suffered, rather than the damage your floor suffered. In this case, the applicability of the term hinges not so much on who's doing it as on what it's happening to. In geology, the term ‘erosion’ is usually applied to land surfaces rather than individual, ...


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