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No, the rate of flow would usually be unaffected. The same volume of water has to get to the sea, so unless the ice was so thick and so well anchored to the riverbank as to exert pressure on the flow of water beneath, which is very unlikely, the rate of flow would remain the same. If, in the unlikely event that the ice exerted pressure on the water, the rate ...


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The Cimarron River, a salt river, extends 698 miles (1,123 km) across New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas. The headwaters flow from Johnson Mesa west of Folsom in northeastern New Mexico. Much of the river's length lies in Oklahoma, where it either borders or passes through eleven counties. There are no major cities along its route. The ...


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It sounds as though you have ideas on the tools you'd like to use, but not on an actual question that you want to use them to answer. You probably need to either come up with such a question, or focus instead on methodology - in studying the tools and the effectiveness of using them in a given scenario. For nearly any modelling project, its viability will ...


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The word "hydrological" is meant to indicate that the model only includes a sort of bulk description of the water: where it is, how much is there, and where it flows. It generally only includes length and time scales of interest to the system in question. So, for ground water models, this may be tens of meters and longer in horizontal direction, and hours ...


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