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16 votes

If we assume the mega impact hypothesis for the formation of Moon, where on Earth is the impact point?

I think you are confused about the timescales and the magnitude of the impact that is being talked about here. The collision between the early Earth and a roughly Mars sized body, Theia is thought to ...
bon's user avatar
  • 2,211
11 votes
Accepted

Why would a Martian tsunami travel at only 200 km/hour, four times slower than on Earth?

The linked paper does numerical modelling of a hypothetical tsunami and predicts speeds between 60 m/s (at its point of origin) and 30 m/s (nearer to shore). We can try a back-of-an-envelope ...
Semidiurnal Simon's user avatar
7 votes

Origin of the continents

The impact which created the moon occurred quite early into the Solar System's lifespan. Bodies of that size would have both still been mostly molten at the time of impact; so as far as I am aware, ...
desander's user avatar
  • 415
4 votes

If an asteroid strikes a glacier, does it make a print on the land below?

A 10 km asteroid would not only obliterate the section of glacier it hit, but also create a huge crater at the impact site! The asteroid that created the Vredefort crater in South Africa is estimated ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
4 votes

What techniques are used to date asteroid impacts?

Several possible ways.. Stratigraphic (Local): If the crater has been buried, just date the first rocks that are on top of the crater but not disturbed by it; this can be done using fossil-based ...
Andrew Jon Dodds's user avatar
4 votes

Luis Alvarez's K-T Impactor Calculation

The volume of a sphere is $\small\sf{\frac4 3\pi R^3}$, where $\small\sf{R}$ is the radius. The volume of Earth with the 4 cm deep iridium rich layer is, $\small\sf{V_{Ei} = \frac 4 3\pi (6.378\...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
3 votes
Accepted

How reanalysis data influence our research/results?

Welcome to StackExchange SE! I don't think I fully understand your question, but I'll try to answer it. Reanalysis data is the use of weather models and data assimilation to piece back the weather. ...
BarocliniCplusplus's user avatar
3 votes

Chicxulub Asteroid Remains?

There are micro-tectites galore, strewn over thousands of square kilometres. But remains of the actual bolide? Hard to say, because the impact crater is now buried under 600 metres of sediment. ...
Gordon Stanger's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Haean, South Korea: is it of volcanic or meteor impact origin?

A Korean here. Haean Myeon in Gangwon-do has two theories of creation. One is Meteor impact and another is differential erosion. There were no meteor related evidence found at Haean so the erosion ...
Arandomstudent21's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a way to calculate crater depth?

If you search the internet there will be a number of papers discussing the depth to diameter ratios of craters on various bodies throughout the solar system (Moon, Mars, Vesta, asteroid 162173 Ryugu). ...
Fred's user avatar
  • 24.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Sediment boundarys produced by largest meteors? Vredefort, Sudbury and Chicxulub

Vredefort No extraterrestrial iridium anomaly: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1989LPSC...19..733F I'm not sure I fully agree with them, because there is quite a lot of Ir there and their threshold ...
Gimelist's user avatar
  • 23.1k
1 vote

Climate consequences of very large asteroids striking the Deep Ocean

A 5km impactor would make a very, very global mess. Here's a discussion of tsunami formation from asteroid impacts. It presents numbers for impactor size up to 2km, and posits a rule-of-thumb that ...
jeffB's user avatar
  • 798
1 vote

Could dust blown up by a comet impact render the air unbreathable?

Dust would not have to be chemically poisonous to render air unbreathable but a big impact would first of all release a blast of hot plasma that nothing nearby will survive with accompanying air blast....
Ken Fabian's user avatar
  • 2,120
1 vote

Could dust blown up by a comet impact render the air unbreathable?

tl;dr while the docudrama is over-dramatised, yes, this is possible. Simply put, we already have processes which do make air unbreathable in small or even large areas, from dust or poisonous gases. ...
Rory Alsop's user avatar
1 vote

Could dust blown up by a comet impact render the air unbreathable?

Disclaimer: I haven't watched the docudrama. For a comet impact, I think the chemical effects (dumping poisonous gases into the atmosphere) would be completely overwhelmed by the thermal effects (...
jeffB's user avatar
  • 798
1 vote

Could dust blown up by a comet impact render the air unbreathable?

That doesnt seem realistic since eventually all the dust from all the volcanic activity, as well as that caused by our doing, eventually makes its way back down to earth. Most dust particles end up ...
Armondo Villaescuza's user avatar

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