16

If you're open to a more mechanical solution, I'd suggest building a "tipping bucket rain gauge", best explained by a picture (source: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Sideview-of-tipping-bucket-Rain-Gauge_fig4_304297354): This should be relatively easy to build and it's trivial to read this electronically by detecting the time it takes to tip. ...


13

Upon reading the question my first thought was, please define what is meant by "how hard is it raining?". My initial tangent thought was "what about the impact energy of the rain" - heavy rain can be felt. Anyone who has heard rain fall on a metal or poly-carbonate roof will know the difference in noise produced by light and heavy rain. ...


12

It's not perfect, but a simple solution to the issue of a puddle building up on the resistance plate is to tilt the plate a bit, so that instead of the water building up on the plate it runs off. Your device would then look for sudden drops in resistance, indicating that a droplet has formed on the device, followed by the resistance rising again after the ...


12

One way to do that is to estimate how much water is changing. If you can ignore the spill over, then that is approximately how much the puddle is changing. Another idea you can use is to measure the changing weight of a rain gauge (that will need to be emptied daily, unless you can rig something that will do that for you). The faster the weight increases, ...


5

A good place to start would be with Fortin barometers. They were "commonly used at meteorological stations to measure atmospheric pressure". The advantages of this type of barometer are its portability (inverted), and that it permits the inspection of both free surfaces of mercury whose difference in level have to be measured. The major ...


5

I would approach this by counting pings on a plate with an attached piezo or microphone. The amplitude of the ping will give the volume of the drop and the number of pings the drop quantity. This is a more robust real-world interface than an electrode sensor.


5

A 'video disdrometer' is a device for characterizing raindrop size distributions. Professional versions (e.g A 1D distrometer) can use a video camera to image the shadow cast by water droplets moving in front of a bright light. So one DIY approach might be a camera imaging rain drops falling through a gap. Delft university have put up an instructable for an ...


4

I sort of accidentally did this in one of my projects in a complicated, backhanded sort of way. I installed 16 soil moisture sensors in my yard as part of an attempt to track the distribution of water in the soil of a flower garden. The sensors are battery powered. They transmit their data via Bluetooth Low Energy to a couple of WiFi enabled control nodes in ...


3

You could connect a funnel to a water wheel. The faster it spins the higher intensity of the rain. This sensor was selected randomly, as should not be consider something I specifically endorse. https://usa.banggood.com/TZT-5V-Piezoelectric-Film-Vibration-Sensor-Switch-Module-TTL-Level-Output-Geekcreit-for-Arduino-products-that-work-with-official-Arduino-...


3

Instead of «whirling thermometer» you probably refer to «sling psychrometer» consisting of a dry-bulb thermometer and a wet-bulb thermometer. Yet, different to a static wet-bulb thermometer shown in the question, the constant rotation of the two thermometers permits evaporation from the wet cloth around the web bulb thermometer to «pristine parts» of ...


2

Edit: This answer refers to the first version of this question which asked about "gravitational waves". Typically, the term "gravitational wave" is reserved for distortions ("strain") in spacetime, in accordance with General Relativity. Gravitational waves are a property of spacetime and can thus propagate in empty space. In ...


2

I misunderstood how wet bulb thermometers worked and was confused too... and I'm hopeful that explaining my separate confusion will actually help put emphasis on what's really happening for your question too... I always was taught that as a sling psychrometer was spun, water would keep evaporating by taking heat from the thermometer, and it would keep doing ...


1

It looks like a geophysical method. But a wide variety of such methods have been applied to the Yamal crater by Olenchenko et al. (2015): The complex of geophysical survey techniques included electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), near-field transient electromagnetic sounding (Transient Electro Magnetic (TEM) sounding), magnetic survey, and radioactivity ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible