23 votes
Accepted

How much of a mountain is below the surface?

Is there some kind of math rule for how much does a mountain extends (depth) below the surface? Definitely! It is called isostasy. When I was a student, the lecture about isostasy started with a ...
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  • 22.2k
17 votes
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What are the non-anthropogenic causes of The Netherlands' low elevation?

Forming of coastline During the last ice age, the North Sea was dry. When the ice melted sea levels slowly started to rise again and due to tides and currents a barrier of dunes was formed along what ...
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  • 420
16 votes

How high can a mountain possibly get?

Found an article that used a simple analytical modelling to determine how high a mountain can be. Reference Based on simple physics, tallest a mountain will be on Earth is ~10 km. This is based on: ...
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15 votes
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What were the tallest mountain ranges in Earth's geological past?

Factors determining the maximum possible height of mountains include the rate of uplift versus the rate of erosion[a] and rock strength. Rock strength is controlled by the type and internal structure ...
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  • 2,824
13 votes

How high can a mountain possibly get?

The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis (summary; sample paper) is that mountains can't get much higher than the elevation at which glaciers form cirques. The upper walls of the cirques are steep and erode ...
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  • 531
9 votes
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How much would the Greenland landmass isostatic rebound contribute to long term climate change?

Be warned this is a general (and speculative) answer, but it was getting too long to be a comment: The bulk of Greenland's ice mass is centred over inland/central Greenland. If you were to take all ...
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  • 1,787
6 votes
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Is altitude of everything decreasing due to sea level rise?

Altitudes are referred to a geoid (an imaginary surface of equal gravity strength), that is chosen to fit the mean sea level. Therefore, if we were to constantly adjust the geoid to fit the rising sea ...
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  • 17.1k
5 votes
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How can isostatic compensation of the crust be reconciled with a relatively strong upper mantle?

Because it is not the strong portion that gets displaced. The mantle just below the crust bends, just like the crust above it, together they make up the lithosphere, It is not the thing being ...
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  • 6,558
5 votes
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How to define the force at the base of an oceanic crust

Your approach of adding all the forces together is correct. You have a mistake in in the solution of the $F_{oc}$ integral, though. You forgot to integrate the terms $\rho_{w}gh_{w}$ and $-\rho_{oc}...
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  • 413
5 votes
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How to calculate hydrostatic equilibrium?

I am assuming you are asking for the case of sea level being 200m higher and in isostatic equilibrium. In that case we can make use of Airy's isostasy model: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isostasy#...
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  • 413
5 votes

Is Mount Everest currently becoming taller or shorter every year?

The question seems to assume that the increase or decrease in mountain elevation is consistent and uniform, which it isn't. The Indian and Tibetan tectonic plates are converging in a NNE-SSW direction ...
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4 votes
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What evidence is there linking melting ice caps and changes in tectonic movement?

Continents move slowly. Glaciations are ephemeral in comparison. That said, there apparently is a huge connection between plate tectonics and whether the Earth is in icehouse or hothouse conditions. ...
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