Skip to main content
17 votes

How high can a mountain possibly get?

Found an article that used a simple analytical modelling to determine how high a mountain can be. Reference Based on simple physics, tallest a mountain will be on Earth is ~10 km. This is based on: ...
Earth Science Expatriate's user avatar
13 votes

How high can a mountain possibly get?

The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis (summary; sample paper) is that mountains can't get much higher than the elevation at which glaciers form cirques. The upper walls of the cirques are steep and erode ...
cphlewis's user avatar
  • 521
6 votes
Accepted

Is altitude of everything decreasing due to sea level rise?

Altitudes are referred to a geoid (an imaginary surface of equal gravity strength), that is chosen to fit the mean sea level. Therefore, if we were to constantly adjust the geoid to fit the rising sea ...
Camilo Rada's user avatar
  • 17.7k
5 votes
Accepted

How can isostatic compensation of the crust be reconciled with a relatively strong upper mantle?

Because it is not the strong portion that gets displaced. The mantle just below the crust bends, just like the crust above it, together they make up the lithosphere, It is not the thing being ...
John's user avatar
  • 6,931
5 votes
Accepted

How to define the force at the base of an oceanic crust

Your approach of adding all the forces together is correct. You have a mistake in in the solution of the $F_{oc}$ integral, though. You forgot to integrate the terms $\rho_{w}gh_{w}$ and $-\rho_{oc}...
ye-ti-800's user avatar
  • 413
5 votes
Accepted

How to calculate hydrostatic equilibrium?

I am assuming you are asking for the case of sea level being 200m higher and in isostatic equilibrium. In that case we can make use of Airy's isostasy model: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isostasy#...
ye-ti-800's user avatar
  • 413

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible