10

Real clouds are beautiful because they are huge and you observe them from far away, thereby gaining the ability to see a distinct "boundary" and, therefore, shape. But if you ever travel through a cloud in a plane, thereby seeing one close up, you'll find that they really are "just fog". You'd struggle to recreate a scale cloud in a tiny environment; water ...


8

Magnetohydrodynamic experiments intended to create laboratory analogues for the Earth's magnetic field generally use molten sodium rather than nickel. You can read about the details of one such project, DRESDYN, in this arXiv preprint. The central part of the envisioned precession dynamo experiment… will be a cylindrical vessel of approximately 2 m diameter ...


7

I recall reading on a couple of occasions how a very large NASA hangar exhibited a phenomenon of 'raining indoors.' It was no roof leak, either, because it could be a cloudless night and it would still happen. Supposedly, there were actually clouds forming inside the building. Here is an article about it: http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-03/...


7

One of quite elegant physical demonstrations by Robert W. Wood involved re-creating a tornado in a lecture hall. Source (quoting from memory): Seabrook, W. Doctor Wood, Modern Wizard of the Laboratory. New York, 1941.


7

Oxford Instruments used to sell a VSM (vibrating sample magnetometer) with an oven option up to 1000K. Mounting samples was made using a "non-magnetic" paste/cement. You may want to look into that.


6

Yes it is possible to build a structure similar to what you describe, and this is exactly what some researchers use to study cloud formation and the processes that operate within them. The other answers and comments have established that re-creating full-scale weather systems is probably out of the question, but meteorological cloud chambers exist for ...


6

The artist Berndnaut Smilde regularly creates fairly large clouds inside buildings. An example: Nimbus II, 2012 Digital C-type Print 75 x 112 cm Hotel MariaKapel, Hoorn, Netherlands The clouds are a combination of aerogel and condensed water vapour, but I'm not sure exactly how they are made. The clouds typically only last long enough to get a couple of ...


3

You probably mean 50kgN/ha, which sounds like a plausible number for fertilizer application. I don't know what you are doing exactly, but you need to know how much surface area your soil sample represents. If you do planting tests, it will be simply the surface of your bed. Then it's just mulitplying the surface area by 50kgN/ha (mind the units!). Now you ...


2

Your question is quite similar to one that I asked some time ago, with the additional requirement that the glue be insoluble in water, which unfortunately excludes sodium and potassium silicate. Like you, I've found Ceramabond (albeit 571, not 569, in my case) to be too magnetic. I suspect that there's an element of random variation here. It's not (as far as ...


2

Yes, it has. Cody & Cody (1998), Journal of Sedimentary Research. http://archives.datapages.com/data/sepm/journals/v55-58/data/058/058002/0247.htm Abstract: Gypsum crystals were grown in experimental conditions analogous to saline terrestrial environments within bentonite clay gels by diffusion control at three different temperatures, four ...


1

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) offers a rotating tank setup. This so-called 'weather tank' enables a large set of experiments demonstrating a wide range of phenomena that occur in the atmosphere and ocean. Adding different food dyes into the rotating tank makes it possible to visualize the phenomena, sometimes producing beautifully looking ...


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