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22

Absolutely not. First of all, "rare earth magnet ore", meaning the ores of metals like neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm), is not magnetic at all. It only becomes a magnet once you make a magnet out of it. For example, one such magnet is Nd2Fe14B and it only becomes a magnet after neodymium is combined with iron and boron. Naturally occuring neodymium ore ...


11

No. Cosmic radiation are high-energy particles that create particle showers high up in the terrestrial atmosphere. Those particle shower are heavily beamed downwards, and although in principle some secondary shower products feel the local magnetic fields, effectively are not affected by the natural terrestrial field, let alone weaker local fields. Those ...


8

Yes, there are maps that map out variations in the earth's magnetic field, example here http://science.gc.ca/eic/site/063.nsf/eng/97358.html. The large variations are primarily due to the presence of ferric materials, ie large deposits of material like magnetite. There are no areas of rare earth magnets as far as I know, given that rare earth magnets are ...


4

To complete Gimelist's answer: many silicic domes and flows lie right on top of a tephra layer with the same age and composition. See for instance this classic paper of Fink (1980) about Little Glass Mountain. This is interpreted as follow: a gas-rich magma ascends into a conduit and, because of its high volatile content, fragments, leading to an explosive ...


4

Explosive volcanic events happen mostly because of saturation in gases, and increase in pressure above the strength of the top of the magma chamber. As the magma decompresses or cools, H2O (mostly), CO2 (also important), and other gases such as H2S, SO2, HCl, etc, form bubbles and increase in volume. If the magma chamber is confined, there is also an ...


4

Main difference between a subvolcanic verses a plutonic is depth at which the rock solidified at from its molten state. Plutonic implies a depth greater than subvolcanic by definition but I am sure there is some overlap between shallow end of plutonic and subvolcanic. Depth of emplacement for plutonic would mostly be much greater than 2 km. Plutonic is ...


3

I've already commented on this before here. This will not work regardless of whether this is iron or lead or anything else. The fact that it was published in Nature does not mean it is true, always remember that. A 108 kg ball of iron would have about 30 metres in diameter, which is not a lot, compared to Earth scales. Here is why it will not work: We ...


2

The magnetic field stops the charged particles mostly by trapping them along their fields lines (globally parallel to the ground at most latitudes, plunging to the ground near the poles (therefore allowing northern lights). If you 1up nature and build a massive electromagnet, you could at most create a secondary pole, which would act as particle channel to ...


2

Although the other answers have correctly pointed out that this isn't a relevant thing on Earth, it should be mentioned that such an effect does occur on the Moon: it is the likely cause for the Lunar swirls. These are though to be the result of magnetic anomalies causing local shielding of the surface from solar wind. This effect prevents the regions from ...


2

Magnetite is a type of iron ore and does not significantly affect the Earth's magnetic field. It would not protect you from cosmic radiation. However, cosmic radiation is more intense high in the atmosphere, so airline cabin crew and people living on high mountains are slightly more at risk. If you are worried about how to avoid radiation damage, the thing ...


2

What's happening is called induced magnetism, detailed in a variety of places, including this paper by Kostadinova-Avramova and Kovacheva in Geophysical Journal International: It is well established that baked clays, when cooling from temperatures around 700 °C in a weak magnetic field, such as that of the Earth, acquire a thermoremanent magnetization ...


1

Back arc basin lavas are basaltic and similar to the magma from mid ocean ridges, except that the magma from back arc basins is about four times as rich in magmatic water, which is typically 1.5 percent by weight of the rock.


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