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Just as there are many different rocks and soils on Earth, so there are many different rocks and soils on Mars. To reproduce a Martian soil, you need to bear two things in mind. Firstly it should have all the vital nutrients plants need to grow, and secondly it should have no component of biological origin. That rules out limestone for a start. Your soil ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_regolith_simulant#MGS-1 has a link to a standard for Martian regolith that includes recipes. It will, though, not be trivial to replicate the grain size from the minerals. Silicate stuff is hard, one might need an expensive mill or grinder to produce it, or a friend who works at a stonecutter's workshop. Perchlorates are ...


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If you enlarge the picture and follow a line at 1 o'clock from the weirdly shaped piece in question, a few feet away from it at the back of an imaginary 'man's head' rock, you will see a similar convoluted piece. Now follow a line at 10 o'clock from our original specimen, and also a few feet away is a longer,straighter piece in the process of eroding from ...


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What you can see in the bottom picture is sandstone/mudstone/claystone. If you look at the bottom picture top right you can see a thin rock that has split off, this is how a rock splits after it has been heated and then suddenly gets cooled down as it does on Mars when the Sun goes down. On Earth the change in temperature is too slow for this to happen in ...


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