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Are you asking about the energy from the sun causing the circulation cells to circulate? If so, that's the easy part. I sound like I know what I'm talking about, but I'm not really a reliable source. But here's my analysis: Sun heats the earth at the equator at steep angles, thus providing a lot of heat to the air at the equator. This air expands and ...


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I'm guessing here, but there are two things that seem to mechanically form the organized concentrated air rivers that are jet streams. I've despaired to find no good meterologist site or link that goes beyond grand vague hand waving gestures that mostly over-explain Coriolis Forces and irrelevant complexities. Here's how I think the actual organized ...


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First off very few people are using Basemap from Matplotlib these days. From this link matplot basemap Basemap is deprecated in favor of the Cartopy project. See notes in Cartopy, New Management, and EoL Announcement for more details. So we are going to use cartopy in addition with matplotlib to plot the grib file that you have provided. Before I ...


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Yes, you can increase evaporation by spraying the sea water as an aerosol because this increases surface area. It's the same with fresh water too, but why would you want to do it? It wouldn't have any noticeable effect on the humidity of the general area. The only useful effect that I can see concerns fresh water only. Spraying the water from a pond or small ...


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To add to the comprehensive answer on weather patterns, The weather and climate in Australia is affected by conditions in the oceans, particularly the equatorial Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean. These drive the major weather systems and their interactions affect the patterns over the continents. Here are good, layperson, introductions to the main weather ...


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Well, the amount and intensity of wild fires are a direct outcome of global warming, that's not really news. According to this article that cites a work i can't find, until the mid of December 2019 the Australian fires emitted ~250million tons of carbon, ~50% of Australia's yearly production. A recovery in the coming decades is unlikely, because the ...


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It is unlikely that the Australian fires will produce enough particulates by themselves to induce measurable global dimming, but we can't be sure because the fires are not yet finished and could continue for months. Another thing to remember is that Australia is not the only country to have major wildfires, so it seems probable that the combined effects of ...


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It primarily has to do with the pattern on high and low pressure systems as they present themselves over the continent. In the southern hemisphere, high pressure systems rotate anticlockwise and low pressure systems rotate clockwise. Because the north of Australia is close to the equator, generally the north of Australia has a low pressure trough over it. ...


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The answer is very simple: Australia is continental in size. You might as well ask why some parts of Europe swelter in heat waves or suffer from droughts while at the same time of year other parts do not. On another occasion, the droughts, floods or heatwaves could be affecting different parts of Europe, Australia or whatever continent we are discussing, ...


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Very unlikely, especially as the major industrial nations will come nowhere near to meeting their greenhouse gases emission targets. Major volcanic eruptions, like major earthquakes, are random and unpredictable. The last really big volcanic eruption we had was Tambora, on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa in 1815. That caused climate cooling for a few years, ...


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