6

The formula for moisture flux is $$q\vec{V} $$ where $q$ is the water vapor mixing ratio, which can be found using mixhum_ptr and $\vec{V}$ is the velocity. Therefore the divergence of the moisture flux must be $$\nabla{\dot{}q\vec{V}}=\frac{\partial(qu)}{\partial x}+\frac{\partial(qv)}{\partial y}+\frac{\partial(qw)}{\partial z} $$ $$\approx\frac{\delta(...


5

I imagine you have a horizontal grid (x,y) and wind components u(x,y) and v(x,y). Normally we do 1-degree of latitude constant (y-dimension) and equal to 110000 m. So your dy depends on how many degrees per grid point you have (yresolution). However, dx will vary according to the latitude. dy=110000*yesolution; Now, we may use centered finite differences ...


3

The easy answer is to use finite difference. Which one is entirely your choice. For example, I'll choose a simple centered difference scheme. You say you have a grid, and your point ($x$,$y$) is at the ith and jth gridpoint, where i indicates the left-right index on the grid and j indicates the north-south index on the grid. Therefore $u$ and $v$ can be ...


2

MFC can be employed to detect frontal structures and possible storms, which can be related with high values of MFC, which means convection of winds with high quantity of moisture... In a field map, you will be able to identify fronts as structures with high values of MFC. Try to plot along with pressure field for better understanding if you are able to. ...


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