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On a broader scale the ITCZ and monsoons are related. This is because the global circulation shifts as a result of the tilt of the earth's axis relative to the orbit around the sun. In northern hemisphere summer, the northern hemisphere is tilted towards the sun and receives more radiation (energy) than the southern, and vice versa for northern winter, The ...


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The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is a single satellite, carrying multiple instruments on board, as described here. It makes a total of 16 orbits/day at a low altitude of 400 km, with different swath widths for each instrument. Thus, the measurement product that you get is not a "continuous" measurement of a single atmospheric ...


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Somalia's dryness despite it's proximity to the equator (which should provide ample opportunities for year round rainfall) has perplexed most meteorologists. In this following answer we will try to explore some of the reasons behind this paradox. There are three major airflows - the Congo Air(Part of the Congo Air Boundary ) that brings in westerly and south ...


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The Indian Summer Monsoon(ISM) has several layers of complexity as it involves interactions between land, sea and atmosphere. This answer will focus on the state of the art overall understanding of the ISM and provide a summary of the salient features of the interactions between land, sea and atmosphere. In general it should be noted that while some ...


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Here are two parts of an answer, but this is by no means complete. Most monsoonal research is focused on explaining the monsoonal passage through the plains of the Indian subcontinent. Very few papers can be found on how the same troughs cause rainfall at 3000 meters. I would like an authoritative reference on Monsoonal Mountain Meteorlogy. All that is ...


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I am going to have a different perspective on this question. In relation to this incident - Kedarnath Floods and from this paper - Cloud Burst in Kedarnath no TRMM PR passes were available for the 16th of June and only two passes were available for the 15th - 17th June period over Uttarakhand. This raises the question whether TRMM can be indeed be used to ...


2

Mango showers, or ‘mango rains’, is a colloquial term to describe the occurrence of pre-monsoon rainfall! Monsoon is prevailing wind due to seasonal changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation associated with the asymmetric heating of land and sea. Usually, the term monsoon is used to refer to the rainy phase of a seasonally changing pattern. They ...


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Thats a very heavy question and might need a dozen pages to briefly answer, but however its better to summarize the answer and refer to the most detailed review work of Pin Xian Wang and his team entitled "The global monsoon across time scales: Mechanisms and outstanding issues". I hope this can answer all the questions anyone have in mind. General ...


2

Summarizing what I wrote in the comments 1) The monsoon does not start off in the Arabian Sea. There is actually a cross equatorial gradient that drives winds from the Southern Indian Ocean into the Northern Indian Ocean and then into the Arabian Sea. 2) There is also a second branch of the Indian monsoonal winds and that is the Bay of Bengal branch. This ...


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The Somali Desert is in the rain shadow region of the Ethiopian Highlands. This has contributed to the aridity of the region. The diversion of moist air to the low-pressure regions in the South West Monsoon of Asia. This is a paraphrased piece of text from Quora. It is Notable how dry Somali is, which I regularly notice when looking at maps, how the color ...


1

The Indian Ocean dipole is essentially a measure of the difference in sea surface temperatures between the western and eastern Indian Ocean. The El Nino and La Nina are the opposite phases of the El Nino Southern Oscillation cycle that occurs in the Pacific Ocean. The only similarity with the Indian Ocean dipole, is that the difference between the sea ...


1

Answers: A) ITCZ and Monsoon Trough are the zones around Earth’s equator where winds of both hemispheres meet. Winds blow from areas of high pressure (cold air masses) towards areas of low pressure (warm air masses). That means in a simple way, that winds blow from the poles towards the equator and their direction is affected by Earth’s rotation. Obviously ...


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Monsoons are caused by ITCZ changing between the months. This means that because the earth tilts 23.5 degrees north each year, maximum solar insolation varies, causing low pressure to gather. Hence the monsoons.


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