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This is mostly due to the fact that Mars does not have plate tectonics. Therefore the plate stays above the hotspot without moving, allowing magma to rise and pile up at the same place for millions and millions of years. Above the Hawaii hotspot, the oceanic plate is moving, so volcanism tends to drift away with time (actually the volcanism happens at the ...


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The other answer is already pretty good: No plate tectonics and no water erosion allows material to pile up in one place, and then stay put. Neither is the case on earth: The plate moves away from the hot spot, transporting built up rocks with it and causing the magma to find another outlet a few miles over. Hawaii also tends to be a place where you can see ...


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It is a continent-continent collision following subduction, no subduction is taking place at the moment. The ocean floor that was attached to it has vanished into the mantle or got wedged into the thickened crust. The collision builds up immense stress, resulting in deformation, faulting, folding, crustal shortening and uplift of the Tibetan plateau. https://...


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The Deccan Traps are the geological formation that make up the Western Ghats in India. They were formed by massive volcanic eruptions that formed flood basalts. These are layers of lava that are extruded from fissures and spread over wide areas of relatively flat ground or over flat sea floor. The terracing is natural. Each of the layers that you see in the ...


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Leonardo was wrong about this. It is not due to sea level dropping (except in very isolated cases), it's due to the land rising. Sedimentary rocks that form in sea beds are often uplifted by tectonic processes to form mountains and plateaus. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedimentary_rock


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I think that the simplest way is to just look at the map for these two valleys in the Switzerland: Longitudinal valley: You can see that this is perfect example on the map: we can easily see the direction of the ridges and the valley is pointed in the same direction. This type of valley was not made by river, but it was made with compressing of tectonic ...


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Update Note that this answer was given when this question was on biology.stackexchange.com. @jamesqf has IMO a better, more informed, more helpful answer below. I don't pretend to know much of anything about geology! Original answer I'd say that Geology is the better venue, but nonetheless here is an answer. Note that there are lots of reasons why elevation ...


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Just to elaborate on David Hammen's correct comment: The granite is old. The mountain is fairly young. There is no contradiction Mountain belts like the Rockies are built by tectonic forces. Two plate collide, and mountains rise in between. The material that makes up the mountain does not have to form during the collision (although it sometime does). A &...


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Ultimately, it comes from precipitation. Ordinarily we think of rain as coming from low-level clouds, but Putkonen[1] has compiled rainfall data in the Himalayas showing significant rains up to several thousand meters altitude, covering the range where practically everyone lives. It is this precipitation that fills the underground tables mentioned by Jean-...


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Temparate rainforests are characterized by two factors Non-Freezing weather (thou still cold) Average temperatures 39-55 degrees Fahrenheit (Warm oceanic currents omit any periodic freeze) Rain exceeding 55+ inches a year. The Geographic factors that influence them, Mountains on one side and a large body of water where warm currents may flow. Temperate ...


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Basaltic rock is denser than granitic rock and that makes the difference. Also since 2/3 of the mountain is underwater thousands of feet of water are pressing against it to take yield of it's weight. it's like a 300 lb man, jumps in the pool, takes enormous weight pressure off.


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