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What usually happens is that moisture laden air is blown toward mountains and forced to climb higher. As it rises, it tends to become colder and less dense, so can hold less moisture. The surplus moisture is often precipitated in the hills or mountains, so when the air passes beyond the mountains there is much less rainfall. This is known as rain shadow. ...


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I presume you mean if one were a substantial distance away from a lightning strike in the mountains, would it be heard better or worse by another observer the same distance away in the plains and foothills? It depends whereabouts in the mountains this lightning strike occurs and where the observers or listeners are. If it occurred between two rocky ridges ...


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The height of Everest above its base depends on where one considers its base to be - and this depends on which side of the mountain one looks. According to Wikipedia, reasonable base elevations for Everest range from 4,200 m (13,800 ft) on the south side to 5,200 m (17,100 ft) on the Tibetan Plateau, yielding a height above base in the range of 3,650 ...


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The 1954 recorded height of 8,848 m remains the accepted figure for height. As for the elevation of Everest's base, it is 5,380 m (at 17,600 ft).


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examples of mountain ranges with sedimentary or metamorphic cores Mount Everest. At an elevation of 7000 metres and higher, it is all sedimentary rock. Below 7000 metres, it is metamorphic of sedimentary protolith. There are some igneous intrusions into it, but the bulk is a metamorphic schist. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Everest#Geology


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Many mountain ranges do not have igneous cores. The front ranges of the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia are created by thrust faults that push sedimentary strata up to form the mountains. The driving force for this motion is a subduction zone located 100's of kilometres to the west. I believe that the Himalayas mountains are formed in a similar fashion. ...


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