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I am an archaeologist and I specialize in the ancient Maya. Here's how it happens: 1: The vast majority of ancient Maya buildings are built using a "core and veneer" technique. The bulk of the building's volume is earth and stone rubble, faced with a veneer of nicely-shaped limestone blocks that are themselves covered by a layer of lime plaster (stucco). ...


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The accumulation of soil in such situations takes a long time. The main way soil would have been naturally transported there would be by the wind. The wind blown soil would get caught and accumulate. Plants, particularly grasses, would grow on the soil and the plant roots would create mesh that would protect the soil from erosion. You are correct in that ...


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Most of the Mexican pyramids are less steep than their Egyptian counterparts, and have niches and terraces which their Egyptian counterparts don't. An important difference is the climate, which is much damper in Mexico, and shows how the rainforest can reclaim areas where it has been eradicated if the site is then abandoned. Yet another factor is the type of ...


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Disclaimer: this answer is based on what I remember from school and TV. When a volcano erupts with lava flows, the magma cools and forms an inhospitable, sterile surface. The first life to colonise the rocky surface is lichens. When the lichens start dying, they decay into very thin soil layers. Next comes moss which needs a tiny bit of soil. The roots of ...


1

The Accumulation of organic detritus begins when a structure is abandoned or poorly maintained. Plants that thrive without soil (epiphytes, lithophytes) are often the first generation of plants. As they die, new ones take their place and the first layer of accumulated biomass builds to accommodate more sophisticated plants grow in this medium


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