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Salt does sink to the bottom in the oceans. Why? Your question referring to salt. Salt is a solid chemical compound. Take a lump of rock salt of sodium chloride, throw it into the water: it will sink to the bottom. The reason is that the density of sodium chloride with more than 2 g/cm3 is higher than the density of seawater less than 1.1 g/cm3. Of ...


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The total rise in ocean level in cubic miles is 330 cubic miles per year!! By the estimated sediment deposit of 13.5x10*9 tons per year, there is around 169 cubic miles of sediment deposited by rivers each year!! Or over 50% of the ovens rise can be associated with river deposit!! That’s not including what is put in the ocean from coastal corrosion, ...


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There are various charts but not exactly what you want. This one combines burning, industry and cement but shows land sources and sinks separately: CarbonBrief, Le Quéré, C. et al. (2016)


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This is a very complex question, for reasons I shall explain. Firstly. we need to establish what gases there are in the atmosphere before we worry about how much is dissolved in the ocean. Argon deserves a mention at 1 percent, and there are a few other gases in trace amounts, some of them more abundant than methane, some less, but as, like neon, they are ...


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And then there is the saturation issue. Salt can be dissolved in water to a certain degree only. Once that degree is exceeded the salt begins to fall out and sink to the ground. If I remember well the limit for water is something like 35g per litre (depending on the temperature)


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I'm a regular from the Physics Stack Exchange reporting for duty. Why this is a serious question This is a bigger question than you might be giving it credit for. The question is ultimately similar to asking why all the air molecules in the atmosphere do not fall to the floor. Your question comes from a very solid principle in physics which could be called ...


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But it does, but according to each salt's solubility and density. Soluble salts tend to mix into the water and keep suspended. Insoluble salts separate from the solution and creates deposits in the oceanic floor. One famous example was the "de-ironing" of the seas, when iron salts were deposited in the bottom due to the oxigenation of the oceanic water, by ...


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Why does the salt in the oceans not sink to the bottom? Because there isn't any "salt", per se, in the ocean. Salt, as the compound sodium chloride (NaCl) does not exist as a solid in the ocean. It is dissolved into sodium and chloride ions (charged atoms) that exist within the ocean as a homogenous phase (that is, a "thing"). That said, water with sodium ...


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Saltier water has higher mass density, so the gravitational energy can be lowered that way. The concentration differences go up until the free-energy of creating that big a concentration difference balances the gravitational energy change. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Making some simplifying assumptions, they find: ...


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Turbulence, because seawater is, almost, always on the move saltier water is mixed with fresher by wave action and, to a lesser extent in surface waters, by Brownian motion. In Fjordland the annual rainfall is so high (up to 8000mm) that there is a permanent freshwater layer several metres thick that you can drink from sitting over the salt water from the ...


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When dissolved in water, salt breaks up into sodium and chlorine ions, which combine with water molecules so they cannot easily sink. However, there is a tendency for streams of fresh water to float on salt water and rise to the top. This caused problems for British submarines in the Dardanelles Straits during WW1. Moving from almost fresh water to the ...


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Oceans did form on other rocky planets - at least Venus and Mars, and moreover, many moons of Jupiter and Saturn as well. The problem is that of the two other terrestrial "uberplanets" who had oceans - i.e. the aforementioned Venus and Mars - they lost them, but in rather different ways. On Venus, what happened appears to have been that, synthesizing the ...


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The oceans have a huge effect on the climate and temperature of the various regions of the world. Climates fall into two categories: marine and continental. In Britain we have a marine climate, which protects us from the extremes of the European continental climate. Our winters are milder, our summers cooler, because of the proximity of the Atlantic and the ...


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