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This will be a bare-bones answer, because I don't have time to do more. If somebody wants to do a more complete answer, with a figure or two, feel free; otherwise I'll try to come back and expand this in a day or two Good question! If one is familiar with the simple explanations of tides (bulges of water following the moon around the earth), this doesn't ...


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Re: Seamounts vs land based Mountains Mt Everest is the highest land based mountain at 8,800m above sea level. Mauna Kea seems the highest Seamount at 10,100m with 4,200m above sea level and therefore about 6,000m below sea level. A typical Seamount is 1,000 to 4,000m which seems similar to land based mtns. Somewhat avoiding debate over whether above of ...


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So will a tangerine sun loom large over red-hot waves softly breaking on abyssal beaches? Probably not. Interesting question, and one might think that yes - you could melt the evaporite deposits that will be left after all the water is gone. The problem is that molten salts are extremely reactive materials. They will corrode any rock they get into contact ...


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I very much doubt whether this is going to happen within the next billion years, but something like it is bound to happen one day. Our sister planet Venus has already reached a surface temperature of 400C,which has boiled off the oceans but is not hot enough to melt salt. There should be some salt deposits there (even Ceres has some),but perhaps they are ...


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Remember that 360° == 0°. They're the same line of longitude. So the gap between 359° and 0° is no more than the gap between 1° and 2°, and should be handled the same way.


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Other answers have suggested some ways of classifying things into seas or lakes, which are good guides, but inevitably there are exceptions to all of them. Ultimately, the difference is not an oceanographic or hydrological one, but a semantic and cultural one. The names bodies of water have are historical, so what they are called is down to what somebody ...


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It would be unlikely for the Grand Canyon/Colorado, simply because the mouth of the river is too far from the ocean, and the outlet is in the relatively shallow end of the Sea of Cortez: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_California That means that sediments will be deposited to form a delta https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_River_Delta and as the ...


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It is unlikely just from erosion. There are a couple reasons for this but because of the time scale over which this process would occur, other phenomenons might change the geologic picture completely. The reason the canyon formed in the first place is because of tectonics that uplifted the rocks. From this page: Uplift of the Colorado Plateau was a key ...


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SLR is thought to be caused by temperature rise, which is caused by CO2 rise and other factors. Temperature has been rising since before 1850. It could be another Question: "Why temperature does not correspond with CO2 levels since 1850". Robert A. Rohde, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported


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First, based on the ONI, there are El Niño and La Niña periods, not necessarily years. For example, 2016 was El Niño during the first half and La Niña during the second half. On the flip side, From summer 1998 to early 2001 was one continuous La Niña period. Second, The The wording that the NOAA gives for official classification of El Niño and La Niña ...


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